Free and Fair Trade

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TABLE OF CONTENT

1.0INTRODUCTION
1.1Organic Products/Local produce
1.2Fair Trade Products
2.0FACTS AND FIGURES
3.0GROWTH PROSPECTS
4.0MARKETING INITIATIVES AND THEIR EFFECTIVENESS
5.0EXISTING AND NEW PRODUCTS
6.0AWARENESS, ATTITUDES & BEHAVIOURS OF CONSUMERS
6.1'Fair-trade Man'
7.0 FAIR-TRADE LABELLING ORGANIZATION
8.0SECONDARY RESEARCH
8.1The average spender
8.2Suppliers
9.0QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
10.0QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH
11.0FUTURE
12.0CONCLUSION
13.0REFERENCES
14.0APPENDICES

1.0INTRODUCTION
Ethical food includes three of the most popular varieties of food: -Organic food
-Fair-trade food
-The utilization of farm foods grown and sold in local areas. (Local produce)

The concept of ethical food concerns the lack of good quality, healthy food, and the frustrations with the supermarkets’ dominance and control over the way that food is produced and sold in the UK.

1.1Organic Products/Local produce
There is a large range of organic foods; this variety includes frozen foods, crops, snacks and soft drinks. Nowadays, there are more people turning to organic food as a more reliable and safer way to feed themselves and their family. Most consumers now recognize the fact that non-organic foods can contain pesticides, chemical fertilizers and herbicides.

1.2Fair Trade Products
“Fair-trade is about better prices, decent working conditions, local sustainability, and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers in the developing world.” If there is an injustice of conventional trade, Fair-trade will address it and facilitate the poorest, weakest producers. This enables them to improve and control their lives. Fair-trade is a long term relationship between producers and buyers. Different from aid, which depends on donors, Fair-trade considers the situation of farmers, workers, and their families and offers a more sustainable solution for them to improve their living standards. This long term relationship improves the livelihoods and well-being of producers by improving market access, strengthening producer organizations, paying a better price and providing continuity in the trading relationship. According to Redfern & Snedker (2002) ‘the protection of human rights by promoting social justice, sound environmental practices and economic security’ best describes fair-trade and it’s potential. 2.0FACTS AND FIGURES

In order to provide a sense of scale for Fair Trade it is useful to look at some facts and figures that describe the ‘success story’ of Fair Trade: •World wide sales of labelled Fair Trade products are estimated at €1.1 billion for 2005 (Max Havelaar, 2006: 28). •Between 2003 and 2004 the sales of labelled Fair Trade products grew by 56 percent, exceeding the annual growth of 42 percent between 2002 and 2003 (FLO, 2006). In Europe:

Sales of Fair Trade products amount to a minimum of 660 million Euro in 2005( 60 million of non-labelled products ) •Sales of Fair Trade products increase by 154% in the last 5 years •Fair Trade products are available at 79,000 points of sale •More than 100,000 volunteers are involved in the 2.800 world shops and the 200 Fair Trade importing organization (Krier 2005) •Only an estimated 25% - 45% of Fair Trade coffee is organic (Zehner, 2002)

3.0GROWTH PROSPECTS
Food generally is forecast to continue to grow significantly. The greater range of fair trade food products available to consumers in supermarkets, the more consumers will buy into the sector. Specifically, wine is thought to have great potential, as they have higher value products such as snacks, and products containing sugar, dried fruit and nuts. Through fair trade shops, the best prospects are seen to come from handmade paper products; accessories such as bags...
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