Frankestein 1818 vs 1831 Edition

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1444
  • Published : January 24, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Frankenstein Final Essay
BY mp
927 Words

Mrs. Mary Shelley
118 Maple Street
Dover, Kent 1453

Dear Mrs. Shelley:

Congratulations on the success of your first published novel, Frankenstein. Indeed you have entranced many readers by the horrific story you have created. Although the publication of the 1818 edition of the novel was successful, we the people at Universal Publishing feel the your latest 1831 edition will increase the novels‘ appreciation. In fact, the 1831 edition of Frankenstein is more effective in developing the characters, plot, and themes. There are many reasons why the latest edition is superior.

Firstly, the 1818 edition is less effective in demonstrating how parental duties directly affect the behavior and life outcome of its creation. In the sixth paragraph in chapter one of the 1818 edition it states, “my improvements and health were their constant care.” Although this shows the care of a parent towards it child, it does not effectively correlate the behavior of a parent to the child’s own behavior. In comparison, the 1831 edition states “[I] was their child, the innocent and helpless creature bestowed upon them by Heaven, whom to bring up to good, and whose future lot it was in their hands to direct to happiness or misery”(19). This directly shows how it is within the creator’s control to affect the life of its creation according their nurture. This passage shows that it is within their control to either direct the creature to misery or happiness. Because the 1831 edition is more effective n the demonstrating this correlation, it can be closely applied to Frankenstein’s behavior towards his creation is a cause for its behavior and actions. This relationship between Frankenstein and the creature is key to the message of the story.

Secondly, in the 1818 edition Elizabeth comes to live with Alphonse Frankenstein, her uncle, when her father decides to remarry. In paragraph six of chapter one in the 1818 edition, Elizabeth’s...
tracking img