Frankenstein Close Analysis Paper

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  • Topic: Word
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“You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings.”

I have chosen to discuss the first sentence from the first letter in Mary Shelly’s novel, Frankenstein. The word choices in this sentence makes the tone seem somewhat resentful. I feel that there is resentment based on the last piece of the sentence “...which you have regarded with such evil forebodings.” To me, this is someone who has been doubted and warned of failure by people, but chooses to prove them wrong. While doing so, this character doesn’t hesitate to rub it in this “doubters” faces a little.

The author uses the phrase “you will rejoice to hear...” which seems a little dramatic to me. Why not use something more simple, such as “you would be happy to know...”? When I think of the word “rejoice” I think of church, an abundance of joy, extreme happiness. The author uses this phrase with a word like “rejoice”, yet goes on using words like “disaster” and “evil” to wrap up the speakers thought. I believe the play on words in this first sentence is setting up a theme that may have something to do with good vs. evil.

Based on this first sentence, I am very interested to keep reading. In the sentence, the speaker says, “...no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise...” I feel that the author is doing a very good job at getting her audience to want more. For me, this sentence alone leaves me feeling like the story is full of excitement and possible has a dark side to it. The contradicting words make me feel like there will be a balance of action and suspense that will keep me on my toes.
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