FRANCIS BACON

Topics: Psychology, Knowledge, Morality Pages: 1 (514 words) Published: December 3, 2014
FRANCIS BACON “OF STUDIES”

Bacon argues that studies "serve for Delight, for Ornament, and for Ability." For delight, Bacon means one's personal, private education; for "Ornament," he means in conversation between and among others, which Bacon labels as "Discourse." Studies for "Ability" lead one to judgment in business and related pursuits. From Bacon's perspective, men with worldly experience can carry out plans and understand particular circumstances, but men who study are better able to understand important political matters and know how to deal with problem according to their severity ("Marshalling of Affairs"). At the same time Bacon encourages studies, he warns that 1) too much studying leads to laziness; 2) if one uses one's knowledge too often in conversation with others, then one is showing off; and 3) to be guided solely by one's studies one becomes a scholar rather than a practical man. Bacon's argument about the value of studies is that moderation is the key to using studies appropriately: studies are wonderful only if influenced by experience because a person's natural abilities are enhanced by studies, but studies without experience, lead to confusion in dealing with the outside world. According to Bacon, dishonest men condemn education; stupid men admire education; but wise men use education as their real world experience dictates. He warns the educated man not to use his education to argument unnecessarily with people; not to assume that education always leads to the correct behavior or understanding; not to use education merely to focus on conversation with others. Rather, Bacon argues, education ("some Bookes") should be read but their advice ignored; other books, ignored completely; and a few books are to be "Chewed and Digested," that is, understood perfectly and used to guide behavior. In addition, Bacon advises that some books can be read by others, who take notes, and the notes can substitute for reading an entire book--but...
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