Forensic Digital Imaging and Photography

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  • Topic: Image processing, Digital image, Digital image processing
  • Pages : 16 (5527 words )
  • Download(s) : 279
  • Published : September 9, 2012
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Forensic Digital Imaging and Photography

As your read further into the text, you will gain knowledge as pertaining to the facts and the history of Forensic Digital Imaging and Photography. You will also learn what devices are used to capture images and output images. I will briefly discuss procedures for storing and archiving images, and what main component devices are used at digital imaging workstations. I will also list insight and background on the Scientific Working Group on Imaging and Technology. Lastly, I will address digital imaging processing and its related legal considerations.

Forensic Digital Imaging & Photography
I. History Of
II. Image Capture Devices
III. Image Output Devices
IV. Storing and Archiving Images
V. Digital Imaging Workstation
VI. SWIGIT ; Digital Imaging Processing & Related Legal Considerations

Police started using photographic images in Paris, of 1841. Photographs became pertinent and profound in the means of establishing and assessing a gallery of perpetrators. Photographs and video tapes recorded at crime scenes were to help investigators and juries understand the spatial relationships between objects and people at the scene of the crime. When we capture photos, we not only preserve the details of the mere facts as seen by the human eye; but we examine the characteristics more carefully- more strategically in depth. Images help investigators “see the bigger picture”. Images help you figuratively and imaginatively capture a moment in time- and bring it to the “now”. It is looked upon how it is seen, perceived, illustrated, and or interpreted “now”. Forensic laboratories are responsible for the generation of many images used by law enforcement and various other agencies. These images sometime document the condition of evidence before and/or after an examination or analysis is performed. In a field setting, the majorities of these photographs require image processing or further scientific analysis. Digital imaging systems offer many benefits not readily available with film or traditional analog video. Digital images are easier to manipulate, therefore making them not as reliable as our earlier used sources. As your read further into the text, you will gain knowledge as pertaining to the facts and the history of Forensic Digital Imaging and Photography. You will also learn what devices are used to capture images and output images. I will briefly discuss procedures for storing and archiving images, and what main component devices are used at digital imaging workstations. I will also list insight and background on the Scientific Working Group on Imaging and Technology. Lastly, I will address digital imaging processing and its related legal considerations. Digital imaging technology is based upon the concept of dividing an image up into a large number of very small picture elements. These elements are arrayed in a regular pattern creating pixels. “A pixel is a single point in a raster image or the smallest addressable screen element in a display device” (Graff, 1999). The smaller the pixels are the more clearly defined the image is. The larger the pixels are, the less defined the image is displayed. Due to the advancement of technology, digital imaging is made up of synchronization of numbers. The digits represent pieces of information needed to construct the image. Film imaging is composed of sensitized materials which visual images are formed. Processing equipment is used to render these images. The use of film, and or paper, is coated with a thin layer and sensitized to light with AgX compounds; then the picture is made. Images created by film cannot be changed once processed, any adjustments must be made when the film and or paper is being processed. Images created digitally can be easily changed, altered, and edited. Digital images can also be recreated and or modified by scanning film ages or other hard copy images,...
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