Food Stamps

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As millions turn to food stamps and obesity rises, Thomas Farley and Richard F. Daines' "No Food Stamps for Sodas" forces us to examine that the free government food stamps are fueling the rise in obesity and bad health.

In constructing their argument Farley and Daines establish themselves authoritative based on their knowledge and occupations.  They are concerned that people are using food stamps to buy unhealthy drinks.  “[Food stamps] has a serious flaw: food stamps can be used to buy soda and other sweetened drinks.”  So what is the real point here?  They use this to prove that food stamps are fueling the paunches of “57%” of adults in New York City. that are over weight.  They word the sentence to prove the point they are trying to make in the most clear way possible.  With this their conclusion is made clear –The authors are making the reader think about how the government is spending the money of the hard working taxpayers.  

Farley and Daines uses choice of detail to point out the flaws of the government’s harmful help and how food stamps are giving promoting unhealthy lifestyle choices in many Americans using food stamps.  Not only are the they trying to fight against the battle of the bulge, but also against other health problems acoompanying the consumption of sugary drinks.   Have you ever looked at a can of soda and wonder what is in it?  Not many people ever do because frankly it just comforts the taste buds too much for us to care, but New Yorkers are discovering diabetes doesn’t taste good at all.

The tone of this piece is matter of fact.  Daines and Farley say, “Sugary beverages in the United States has more then doubled, in parallel with the rise in obesity.” They shove their point in your face with factual information relating the “sugary beverages” to back to the problem of obesity.  They know that if “one-sixth of an average teenagers calories come from these drinks” then the “40%” of overweight teens are directly related back to the...
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