Followership: Leadership and Followers

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There have been many observations regarding the characteristics of a leader, but followership has received less attention. Treister and Schultz (1997) “suggests that a "follower is someone who accepts guidance and, on receiving it, takes the appropriate action." Treister et al (1997) also state followership is “considered a passive or submissive role of lesser importance than leadership. However, the effectiveness of leaders to a large measure depends on the qualities of their followers.” Treister et al (1997) go on to say “good leadership enhances followers, just as good followership enhances leaders." So followers are just as important as leaders are to a leader/follower relationship. Some have categorized followers in different typologies because not all followers are the same. These typologies are based on the follower’s behavior and engagement. Kellerman (2007) “categorizes all followers according to where they fall along a continuum that ranges from "feeling and doing absolutely nothing" to "being passionately committed and deeply involved." Kellerman (2007) “chose level of engagement because, regardless of context, it's the follower's degree of involvement that largely determines the nature of the superior-subordinate relationship.” Followers may fall into different categories depending on the situation, leader, or organization. Kellerman (2007) states that Kellerman (2007) “chose level of engagement because, regardless of context, it's the follower's degree of involvement that largely determines the nature of the superior-subordinate relationship.” According to Kellerman (2007) only a few other researchers have categorized followers. Kellerman (2007) also states these researches “have all argued that leaders with even some understanding of what drives their subordinates can be a great help to themselves, their followers, and their organizations.” Treister et al (1997) “maintains that "leadership and followership be regarded as...
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