Flower of Service

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This report provides an assessment of the current service concept at the North Ridge Lyceum Ltd. It is consists the findings of an analytical assessment of the school using the Flower of Service Concept. Supplementary services, which are the petals, rally around the core of the service which is used to augment the core service or business and also it adds extra appeal to the core. These supplementary service are grouped into two (2) * Facilitating supplementary service element

* Enhancing supplementary service element.
The report also discusses a brief history of education in Ghana and changes that have taken place in this sector in the last ten years as a result of globalization, increase in population, government policies and other factors. We also looked at the current trends in the industry today with a rise in private sector participation and high demand for private education. A brief preface of the school is that it is a private educational facility which is well positioned in the country as one of the best primary and junior high school in Ghana. The assessment of the school, using the flower of service concept saw that information, a supplementary element is inadequately addressed. Whiles order taking and billing and payments facilitating supplementary service element can greatly be enhanced to improve the service gap in the school. Recommendations are discussed in this report to help correct some service gaps we identified during the assessment. Some of them are using Information Technology to correct information and order taking service gaps. Also discussing with parents on how to take proper care of pupils who are not picked up early from school.

INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND
Brief context of the Industry
Due to growing population increase, politics, globalization and continues lack of governmental investment in education, the educational industry has gone through tremendous change over the last fifty (50) years of the history of this country. The main goal of Ghana’s educational system is to produce the needed resource manpower for the country. After Ghana gained Independence in 1957, the educational system was modelled to that of the British system until the 1980’s reforms which starts at the age of six (6) years, consisting of six years primary education, three years junior education, three years senior secondary education and four years university or other tertiary institutions like Polytechnic and teacher training colleges. The educational system can be categorised into the public and private sectors. With the public sector saddled with lots of problems. Problems, such as lack of classrooms, weather affecting infrastructure. Recently, the Ghana News Agency reported a troubling phenomenon in the Bunkpurugu /Yunyoo District where the roofs of 32 school buildings in the area were ripped off by rainstorm, making learning difficult for the pupils. The headmaster of one of the schools indicated that classes were closed when the rains threatened to fall and also when the sun got too hot claiming this could not have happened in urban areas. The ratio of students per teacher is huge, especially in the rural communities. Overpopulation in classrooms is also another problem. According to the Ghana News agency report of the district, one of the classrooms even had 134 pupils creating overcrowding and making teaching quite difficult and stressful for a single teacher. This is about quadruple the average pupil teacher ratio in Ghana which is supposed to be 35 pupils per class. He also complained that since the inception of the JHS system in 2007, “We have never seen a textbook on Religious and Moral Education yet students are made to write it at their final exams.” Besides this challenging situation, Mathematics, Science and English textbooks have been in short supply in schools in that district. Most of the reforms that were introduced had suffered political patronage rendering them...
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