Florence Nightingale: Non-Profit Management Case Study

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  1
 
“The
 Fixed
 Determination
 of
 an
 Indomitable
 Will,
 Florence
 Nightingale”
 
  Florence
 Nightingale
  Florence
 Nightingale
 was
 born
 to
 make
 a
 change,
 because
 she
 possessed
 the
 ambition
 and
 devotion
  to
 help
 people
 at
 a
 very
 young
 age.
 The
 obstacles
 she
 had
 to
 face
 as
 a
 woman
 practicing
 medicine
 in
  the
 nineteenth
 century
 were
 tirelessly
 unending.
 For
 example,
 the
 social
 statuses
 and
 morals
 that
  dictated
 people’s
 decisions
 in
 the
 mid
 1800s
 were
 key
 contributors
 to
 the
 complete
 devastation
 and
  collapse
 of
 the
 contemporary
 healthcare
 practices.
 In
 response
 to
 the
 popular
 yet
 destructive
  morals
 of
 nineteenth
 century
 England,
 Florence
 Nightingale
 actuated
 on
 ethics
 and
 her
 uttermost
  devotion
 for
 changing
 the
 standards
 of
 nurses
 into
 a
 profession.
 Her
 ideas
 were
 innovative
 and
  philanthropic,
 and
 she
 was
 not
 merely
 the
 framer
 of
 the
 nursing
 profession;
 she
 was
 also
 a
 pioneer
  of
 social
 entrepreneurship,
 even
 before
 J.
 G.
 Simon
 established
 the
 term
 of
 a
 non-­‐profit
  organization.
 
  Symptoms
  • Nurses
 were
 not
 considered
 professionals
 in
 the
 mid
 1800s
 and
 even
 had
 a
 bad
 stigma.
  Hospitals
 placed
 their
 patients
 in
 danger
 by
 not
 regarding
 or
 training
 their
 nurses
 as
  professionals.
 The
 funding,
 support,
 and
 education
 that
 the
 nursing
 staff
 lacked
 in
 turn
 dragged
  down
 the
 performance
 of
 their
 institution.
 Hospitals
 were
 thus
 “infested
 with
 rats
 and
 fleas,
  wards
 stank
 of
 underground
 sewage…and
 they
 [soldiers]
 lay
 in
 filthy
 clothes
 along
 four
 miles
 of
  cots”
 (Bornstein
 43).
 The
 issues
 within
 the
 hospitals
 were
 indicative
 of
 broader
 social
 problems.
  Social
 Problems:
 
  • Inequality
 between
 men
 and
 women
  • Society’s
 resistance
 to
 and
 slow
 rate
 of
 change
  • Women
 not
 pursuing
 work
 outside
 the
 home
  • Lack
 of
 available
 knowledge
 and
 education
 to
 bestow
 upon
 higher
 officials
  • Low
 socioeconomic
 statuses
 of
 the
 staff
  • Nursing
 was
 not
 a
 profession
  Of
 the
 problems
 that
 hindered
 the
 delivery
 of
 care,
 Florence
 Nightingale
 had
 to
 contend
 the
  most
 with
 gender
 inequality,
 which
 ran
 much
 deeper
 than
 the
 gender
 discrimination
 of
 the
 current
  century.
 Victorians
 did
 not
 hold
 men
 and
 women
 as
 equals
 in
 any
 manner,
 so
 no
 one
 was
 publically
  going
 to
 take
 Florence’s
 ideas
 seriously.
 
 In
 addition,
 the
 circumstances
 that
 came
 along
 with
 being
  born
 into
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