Floating Power Plant

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FLOATING POWER PLANT

[pic]

By

K. SRIKAR

10071A0228

VNR VJIET

Ph no: 8341103940

Srikar.kollur@yahoo.com

CH. PRADEEP

10071A0211

VNR VJIET

Ph no: 7207606693

cheedaypradeep@gmail.com

ABSTRACT:

The concept of the Floating Power Plant is so far the only one known in the world that has combined the two energy forms and has an operating prototype. Our abstract deals with the Floating Power Plant, the current prototype is called Poseidon 37and MH-1A.

INTRODUCTION

Floating Power Plant (FPP) is a new type energy source based on technologies of shipbuilding and designed to provide a reliable whole-year energy supply to households, industry and infrastructure facilities

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FPP, can combine heat and low-power nuclear station, are vessels projected that present self-contained, low-capacity, floating nuclear power plants. The stations are to be mass-built at shipbuilding facilities and then towed to the destination point in coastal waters near a city, a town or an industrial enterprise. Although the world's first floating nuclear power station was MH-1A, the Rosatom project represents the first mass production of that kind of vessel. By 2015, at least seven of the vessels are supposed to be built.

The floating power plant can economically supply electricity to a specific district or to a specific facility that temporarily uses the electricity and can minimise limitations caused by environmental regulations, and can be used as an emergency electrical power source

HISTORY

MH-1A was a pressurized water reactor and the first floating nuclear power station.

One of a series of reactors in the US Army Nuclear Power Program, its designation stood for mobile, high power.

The FIRST FLOATING NUCLEAR reactor was built for the U.S. Army by Martin Marietta under a $17,000,000 contract (August 1961), with construction starting in 1963.

The original ship propulsion system was removed, and a single-loop pressurized water reactor, in a 350 ton containment vessel, was installed, using low enriched uranium (4% to 7% 235U) as fuel.

The reactor supplied 10 MW (13,000 hp) electricity to the Panama Canal Zone from October 1968 to 1975.

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Waller Marine has played an important role in the reintroduction of the Floating Power Plant (FPP) since the late 1980’s when the Company was asked to inspect the power barge “Impedance”; a barge constructed with steam generating technology that was first used in the Philippines by the US Army in 1940. Since that time, Waller has been involved in development, design, construction and operations of numerous power barge projects using all available generating technologies, different fuels and cooling system

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Floating Power Plants (FPPs), or Power Barges as they are more commonly called, have been around for many years. In fact one of the earlier units, constructed in 1940 by the US Army Corp of Engineers, a 30 MW steam generation facility and put into service in the Philippines, is still in operation at a site in Ecuador. .

.Heavy fuels were selected as the fuel of choice mainly due to cost and availability, with consideration being given to simply meeting World Bank emissions standards being made at the time. Single barge designs ranged from 30 MW up to 100 MW.

DESIGN:-

BARGE CONSTRUCTION:-

When using a semi-submerged structure for a wave energy device, the structure is modified radically compared to a standard barge.

On the Poseidon 37, three sections constitute the barge:

*The front section, which contains the turret mooring,

*The middle section carrying the wave absorbers, and

*The rear section.

The whole structure is 37 meters wide and 25 meters long (excluding the buoy). The middle section can be disconnected from the front, and the energy device can thus be sailed to port without interfering with the mooring. This is needed since...
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