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U.S Attempts to Improve Hawaii
* King Kamehameha III
* Daniel Webster
* Grover Cleveland
* Minister Stevens
* Benjamin Harrison
* John L. Stevens
* Dole Fruit Company
* Kapu System and Ali’is
* Queen Lydia Kamakaeha Liliuokalani

* King Kamehameha III
* Daniel Webster
* Grover Cleveland
* Minister Stevens
* Benjamin Harrison
* John L. Stevens
* Dole Fruit Company
* Kapu System and Ali’is
* Queen Lydia Kamakaeha Liliuokalani

Hawaii became a U.S territory.
Hawaii became a U.S territory.
TERMS AND NAMES
TERMS AND NAMES
WHY IT MATTERS NOW
WHY IT MATTERS NOW
MAIN IDEA
MAIN IDEA

The U. S. annexed Hawaii. Hawaiians lost their land to the United States, but improved their quality of life The U. S. annexed Hawaii. Hawaiians lost their land to the United States, but improved their quality of life

Setting the Stage:

During the period 1778 to 1893, a conflict over trade developed between the U. S. and Hawaii. Increased trade resulted in U. S. trying to colonize Hawaii. Colonization refers to an establishment of settler colonies, trading, and plantations in other countries. Colonization resulted in conflict between the settlers and the native Hawaiians. The conflict was finally resolved when the U. S. annexed Hawaii in 1893.

Who first settled Hawaii?

Figure 1: Polynesian Sailing Vessel
Figure 1: Polynesian Sailing Vessel
Archeological discoveries suggest that the settlement of Hawaii involved two waves of Polynesian migration. Historians believe that the Polynesian explorers came from the South Pacific centuries before Cook arrived in Hawaii. First were the Marquesas that settled in Hawaii in 600 or 700 AD. The second wave came from the Society Islands in about 1100 AD. “Lacking instruments of navigation or charts or any kind, the Polynesians sailed into vast oceans.  They staked their lives on their knowledge of the sky and its stars, the sea and its currents, the flight of birds, and many other natural signs.  They were the superior seamen of their time.” (Hawaiian History)

United States motives for colonizing Hawaii:

Hawaii has the finest harbor and coaling station in the mid-Pacific. In 1851, King Kamehameha III had secretly asked the United States to annex Hawaii, but the Secretary of State, Daniel Webster, declined. (United States Becomes a World Power: The Annexation of Hawaii) Later on, due to the U.S.’s desire to expand, the government agreed to annex Hawaii. With the annexation, the U. S. secured access to what was to become Pearl Harbor. Pearl Harbor is one of the best ports in the world.

Taking Notes
Keep track of the motives by creating a mind map

Taking Notes
Keep track of the motives by creating a mind map

Why did America want Hawaii? Ships crossed the Pacific Ocean to trade in Asia. The Navy needed bases along the Pacific Ocean trade route where they could stop, refuel, and resupply. The islands in the Pacific Ocean are important stops for coal, supplies and repairs. In the South Pacific, the American Navy asked the rights to have bases on Midway and Samoa. The Hawaiian Islands are the closest island to America with a good harbor. Hawaii turned into an important stop for the U.S. Merchant Marine and the Pacific Fleet. Figure 2: Hawaiian Islands

Figure 2: Hawaiian Islands
Profit for Private Business Owners: “In the early 1800s, missionaries from New England made the arduous voyage to Hawaii and settled there. They sent back news of fantastic economic possibilities in the islands. Soon other Americans followed to become sugar planters and to establish profitable businesses.” (Footholds in the Pacific) Competition from Europe: During the 1830s, European countries followed up Captain Cook’s voyage with frequent visits to Hawaii. These countries namely England and France began to force Hawaii to accept treaties giving Europeans economic advantages. In 1842, Secretary of State Daniel...
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