Flappers: Girls Gone Wild

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Flappers: Girls Gone Wild

Up until the early 1900s the pace of change in American lifestyles had been relatively slow with most people experiencing a similar lifestyle to what their past generations had also followed. The rate of change started to accelerate in the early 1900s as new influences had an effect that reached even the furtherest parts of the country. This had the effect of creating a new country-wide culture in the early twentieth century. The movies, radio shows, sophisticated advertising, and popular magazines all had an influence on the lives of 1920’s youth who saw themselves as different from the older generation. Young people began to model themselves on movie and sports stars who represented a glamorous new age, but they also took on many of the negative traits of their idols like smoking, bad language, immorality, and selfishness. This effected many young women throughout the country. They were known as flappers.

After World War I, the Roaring Twenties saw lots of change. Women had the right to vote and new senses of independence and feminism that, when coupled with a popular contempt for Prohibition, may have fueled the flapper fire. The flappers of the 1920s marked the beginning of a revolution of women. During this time, women ditched their conservative feminine looks and went for clothing, makeup and hairstyles that were a far cry from the norm and considered inappropriate at the time. The rebellion led to a revolution in women's fashion and women's roles.

Flappers were usually young, single, middle-class woman. They were considered the “Younger Generation”. They wore more daring fashions rather than the old Victorian fashion many older women wore. Most of them had steady jobs as operators or sales women of too.

They wanted to break away from and defy previous societal norms. This new breed of flappers listened to the new jazz sound and danced provocatively at jazz clubs. They dated freely and treated sex as a much more...
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