Fire Detection System Design

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  • Topic: Smoke detector, Fire alarm control panel, Fire protection
  • Pages : 25 (8377 words )
  • Download(s) : 96
  • Published : September 8, 2011
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Fire Detection System Design

http://www.cooper-ls.com/dg_firesystem.html

Fire Detection System Design

SYSTEM DESIGN In order to undertake the process of designing a fire system for a building it is necessary to have a sound understanding of the relevant design standards, the legal framework surrounding building safety legislation and a sound working knowledge of product application theory. The importance of consultation with all relevant parties cannot be overstressed, neither can the importance of specialist advice in relevant areas. The following system design process is intended to give a reasonable overview of all the areas of knowledge required for the successful design of a fire alarm system. It is envisaged that the user will refer to the information contained within the design section to determine the areas where further detailed advice will be required and to give guidance as to where such advice may be contained. Due to the complex nature of legislation and design standards relating to fire alarm system design, this design guide is not intended to be a comprehensive guide to all aspects of fire alarm design but rather a very useful source of background information to which further application specific detailed information can be added from other sources as required. The standards referred to in this section relate to the UK and Europe. Although the principles are broadly universal, it is recommended for readers in other countries that they familiarise themselves with specific local requirements from their own standards, only using the British or European standards where these have been accepted by local fire authorities. Information relating to equipment facilities and performance apply to Cooper Lighting and Security equipment and may not necessarily apply to other manufacturers equipment. The reader should carefully check whether such comments relate to equipment from other manufacturers before considering alternative equipment. OVERVIEW OF THE DESIGN PROCESS The following describes a typical fire alarm system design process, after each item a section number is provided which relates to the area within the design guide where further information can be found. • Understand the reasons for installing the fire alarm system in the specific property (section 1) • Conduct a risk assessment to help determine requirements (section 2) • Consult with all interested parties (section 3) • Decide on the relevant design standard (section 4) • Establish if third party approval is required - for equipment and/or installation. • Decide on the type of alarm technology to be used • Decide on the appropriate protection category and extent of coverage where relevant (section 5) • Discuss and agree the fire strategy (section 6) • Plan the zoning of the building (section 6) • Select and position relevant system components (section 7) - Select the appropriate detectors for each area - Position the detectors - Select suitable callpoints and position at appropriate locations - Agree on the means of summoning the fire authority - Plan the alarm signalling arrangements (sounders, beacons, pagers etc) • Select a suitable panel (suitably sized and rated with adequate standby autonomy) - Review the design such as to - minimise the potential for false alarms (section 8) - Select Contractor - Ensure suitable wiring of the system (section 9) - Make suitable arrangements for commissioning (section 10) - Appoint/Establish responsible person (section 11) - Make suitable arrangements for ongoing maintenance and monitoring of system performance (section 11) BACKGROUND LEGISLATION The following section contains details of European legislation which relates mainly to legal requirements placed on the manufacturer or importer of equipment. The description is included here to give the user/specifier an understanding of the subject. EMC The EMC directive requires that all electrical and electronic equipment is able to co-exist without interference....
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