Final Report on Fsib

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 120
  • Published : March 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Chapter 01
Introduction
Origin
Objectives
Scope
Methodology
Limitations

Introduction

Bank is a government-licensed financial institution whose primary activity is to lend money. Many other financial activities were allowed over time. For example banks are important players in financial markets and offer financial services such as investment funds. In some countries such as Germany, banks have historically owned major stakes in industrial corporations while in other countries such as the United States banks are prohibited from owning non-financial companies. In Japan, banks are usually the nexus of a cross-share holding entity known as the zaibatsu. In France, banc assurance is prevalent, as most banks offer insurance services (and now real estate services) to their clients.

Private Banks are banks that are not incorporated. A private bank is owned by either an individual or a general partner(s) with limited partner(s). In any such case, the creditors can look to both the "entirety of the bank's assets" as well as the entirety of the sole-proprietor's/general-partners' assets.

A commercial bank is a type of financial intermediary and a type of bank. Commercial banking is also known as business banking. It is a bank that provides checking accounts, savings accounts, and money market accounts and that accepts time deposits. After the Great Depression, the U.S. Congress required that banks engage only in banking activities, whereas investment banks were limited to capital market activities. As the two no longer have to be under separate ownership under U.S. law, some use the term "commercial bank" to refer to a bank or a division of a bank primarily dealing with deposits and loans from corporations or large businesses. In some other jurisdictions, the strict separation of investment and commercial banking never applied. Commercial banking may also be seen as distinct from retail banking, which involves the provision of financial services direct to consumers. Many banks offer both commercial and retail banking services.

Islamic banking refers to a system of banking or banking activity that is consistent with the principles of Islamic law (Sharia) and its practical application through the development of Islamic economics. Sharia prohibits the payment of fees for the renting of money (Riba, usury) for specific terms, as well as investing in businesses that provide goods or services considered contrary to its principles (Haraam, forbidden). While these principles were used as the basis for a flourishing economy in earlier times, it is only in the late 20th century that a number of Islamic banks were formed to apply these principles to private or semi-private commercial institutions within the Muslim community.

First Security Islamic Bank Limited (FSIB) was incorporated in Bangladesh on 29 August 1999 as a banking company under Companies Act 1994 to carry on banking business. It obtained permission from Bangladesh Bank on 22 September 1999 to commence its business. The Bank carries banking activities through its Twenty Six (26) branches in the country. The commercial banking activities of the bank encompass a wide range of services including accepting deposits, making loans, discounting bills, conducting money transfer and foreign exchange transactions, and performing other related services such as safe keeping, collections and issuing guarantees, acceptances and letter of credit.

Origin

Our course instructor for the internship (BUS499) course, Mr. Nayel Jamilur Rahman realized the importance of learning about the solution of operational problem after conversion from conventional banking system to Islamic banking system and prepares a project on that. He asked me to prepare a report for this course requirement of the course internship early in the semester. The plan had to be prepared individually and the business was to be decided on mutual consent. I...
tracking img