Final Proposal

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Final Proposal

In 2009 the Arena Football League ran into financial trouble. The league has since been purchased and now looks ready to reemerge as a more financially secure business. Some said the AFL tried to do too much too soon. With a large television contract on a major network, and eighteen game regular season and player salaries well into six figures, I would agree. The league couldn't control cost, so they couldn't make money. The problem wasn’t fan interest and low attendance; it was a league working outside of their means. By watching, and experiencing some of these mistakes I will help with a model to develop a second tier indoor football league. My model will not try and do too much too fast. I will attempt to find ways to reduce expenditures.

There have been many indoor leagues and indoor league franchises that have folded or shut down operations. One way I will try and save on start-up expenses is approach these teams and leagues to try and purchase some of those assets. These assets may include equipment like helmets and shoulder pads or even the turf to lie down inside the arena with the dasher pads that cover the walls to protect the players. Finding these items at low cost will help in the long run. Arena football is perfect for many people. The hard core football fan will like the hard hitting, and quick scoring. Families like arena football, because it's an inexpensive way to bring the family to a sporting event, and the players are more accessible then NFL players. It's a fun summer time activity that everyone can enjoy. I will make sure that merchandise and tickets remain at an affordable price so that many families can feel that they are going out for an affordable evening of entertainment and they can feel comfortable bringing the entire family. I will start ticket prices at seven dollars per single game. With a home schedule of six games we can begin marketing season passes at just forty-two dollars. The average cost for a family to attend an NFL game can cost hundreds of dollars. A single premium ticket to see the New York Giants in 2012 costs $ 464.75. However, Team Marketing Report bases its findings on average ticket prices, and in 2012 that runs at $78.38, or $313.53 for four. (Yahoo sports 2012) A family can purchase several season passes and attend every home game with the family as opposed to purchasing tickets to just one NFL game. The average cost of just one beer is $7.28. Football fans are no longer limited to just Budweiser and Miller when they go to the stadium. According to Esquire’s “NFL Stadium Food Power Rankings,” many craft brews are available at NFL games, including Goose Island Honker's Ale and Red Bridge Gluten-Free beer. On average, NFL fans can expect to pay $7.28 for a small beer at the stadium. The most expensive are found at San Diego’s Qualcomm Stadium and Buffalo’s Ralph Wilson Stadium, where the cost is $9. The study assumes two beers will be purchased, or $14.56. (Yahoo sports 2012) I will work out a way for vendors and the arenas to get those costs down. Some arenas and other venues do not allow a fan tailgate in order to get those paying customers inside. I will make sure the leagues venues allow a pregame atmosphere where fans can bring their own refreshments and not have to worry about high costs inside. The average cost of a hot dog is $4.84. There is no substitute for a good old fashioned hot dog. According to Team Marketing Report, that’s $4.84 or $19.36 for four. (Yahoo sports 2012)

Parking fees are always a major concern when attending major sporting events like NFL games. Sports venues are often accessible by mass transit, but many will still drive to games. The average cost for parking is $27.35. (Yahoo sports 2012) We have to find a way to get these costs down and encourage our fans to drive to and park at the arenas. It’s hard for some NFL fans to leave the game without taking some merchandise home. Team...
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