Film and Video Production

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Mrs. Grinnell

English 12

1st May 2005

Film and Video Production: Becoming the Future of the Silver Screen

Every so often a movie is released with such tense anticipation and glamorous visual art that the public is drawn to this dramatic rendition of life in the theatre. For even just two hours or so, you are put into a different lifestyle. Action, drama or comedy it may be. We are thrust into a different way of thinking. We are forced to learn the characters thoughts and feelings. The hard work and artistic skill that goes into these magnificent films is not an easy thing to mimic. Out of the thousands of movies released worldwide each year only a handful are truly worthy of the label film art. Most of the great movies are either produced by a multi million dollar company that hired a director with quite a bit of experience under his belt, or are made with little money and slowly find their way into the film business due to increasing popularity because of the good writing and talented though unknown actors in the film. These small films are a great way to get a foot in the door of the giant Hollywood business. There are many courses that need to be taken to get a bachelors degree in film arts, and though not promised, it can really help one get a good footing in the business of film and video production. The first thing needed is to learn the basics of film making. This course would be labeled as Introduction to Film and Video or Introduction to Cinema. It introduces the basic education for prospective film students. It starts with the conceptualization to execution and examines the many different film genres, such as context of history, theory, fiction, drama and comedy. Many major colleges across the U.S. offer this course, such as UCLA, UT at Austin, SDSU and many others. This course is easy to complete and requires no pre-requisites. Though taking courses such as these is not required to get into this business, it is defiantly recommended since one's chance of creating a small film with the common amount of knowledge and having it produced and hit the big time is very slim. Film is such a competitive business that education is crucial if one wants to land a decent job in the work force. Although it is possible to do it all without the education, it is highly unlikely.

The knowledge one learns from just basic filmmaking techniques will prove extremely valuable in the future on the set. Another important skill that needs to be at least looked at is screenwriting. Screenwriting refers to the art and craft of writing screenplays or scripts. Even if one plans on becoming a director and not a screenwriter one needs to know what kind of scripts to look for. This is very important for a beginning small movie director since the reader will most likely be writing their own scripts to get some recognition. A script is a document that outlines every aural, visual, behavioral, and lingual element required to tell a story, according to the dictionary definition at www.Wikidpedia.org. It is crucial to remember that film is a visual medium. One doesn't tell the audience the story, one shows them. So what one will be writing is not a novel but more like explaining a dream on paper. One must learn to write a screenplay visually. As famed director Darren Aronofsky said in an interview with a struggling screenwriter trying to get published, "Most of what one writes that doesn't work on screen will just be improvised on the movie set".

There are many important requirements for screenplays that may seem like minutia at...
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