Film Analysis

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>>>>> Working with Films >>>>> Selected Terms for Film Analysis

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Glossary – Selected Terms for Film Analysis General film terms backlighting filming a person or event against a background of light, especially the sun, which produces an idealized or romantic effect words that are shown on a cinema screen to caption establish the scene of a story composition the arrangement of people or things in a film scene credits the list of people who were involved in the making of a film director the person responsible for the artistic production of a film, e.g. the lighting, camera work, action, and the actors' interpretation of their roles feature film film which tells a story (as compared, for example, to a documentary film) motion picture the North American term for 'film' / movie producer the person responsible for the overall organization, especially the financing and marketing, of a film scene a shot or series of shots that usually deal(s) with a single action the script of a film, including the dialogue and screenplay directions of the setting, camera range, camera movements, etc screenwriter the person who writes the screenplay shot a length of film, however short or long, taken by a single camera without cuts soundtrack the recorded music from a film voice-over an explanation or account given in a film by someone who is not seen (or is not seen talking) Camera range long shot (1) the distance between the camera and object a view of a situation or setting from a distance

medium long shot (2)

shows a group of people in interaction with each other, e.g. a fight scene, with part of their surroundings in the picture

full shot (3)

a view of a figure's entire body in order to show action and/or a constellation of characters

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>>>>> Working with Films >>>>> Selected Terms for Film Analysis

E / Lo

medium shot (4)

shows a subject down to his or her waist

close-up (5)

a full-screen shot of a subject's face, showing the finest nuances of expression

Camera angles establishing shot point-of-view shot over-theshoulder shot (6)

e.g. 'the director uses a long shot of the group so we can see them and the setting …'; 'there is a medium long shot of them so the viewer can see how they interact …'; 'we see a full shot of x as he walks down the street …'; 'the director uses medium shots of x and y to show their reactions to …'; 'x is shown in close-up, so that we see the reaction in her face when …'; 'the viewer sees y in close-up as …'; 'at this point close-ups are used of x and y to show their differing reactions …' often used at the beginning of a scene to indicate the location or setting, it is usually a long shot taken from a neutral position shows a scene from the perspective of a character often used in dialogue scene, a frontal view of a dialogue partner from the perspective of someone standing behind and slightly to the side of the other partner, so that parts of both actors can be seen

reverse-angle shot

a shot from the opposite perspective of a shot that came before, e.g. in a dialogue between two people facing each other, the camera shoots the conversation directed at one actor and then at the other e.g. 'the establishing shot of the film shows the setting …'; 'this scene is shot from x's point of view …'; 'the director often makes use of point-of-view shots so the viewer sees the story from different perspectives …'; 'there is an over-the-shoulder shot of x …'; 'we see x through an over-the-shoulder shot …'; 'the director uses a reverse-angle shot of the dialogue …'; 'we see x and y in reverse-angle shots …' shows people or objects from above, i.e. higher than eye level shows people or objects from below, i.e. lower than eye level views a subject from the level of a person's eyes e.g. 'the director uses a high-angle / low-angle shot of x …'; 'there is an eyelevel / straight-on shot of x …'; 'we see a low-angle / high-angle...
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