filipino

Topics: Philippines, Elpidio Quirino, Ramon Magsaysay Pages: 7 (1836 words) Published: March 15, 2014
commonwealth
List of presidents
The colors indicate the political party or coalition of each President at Election Day. #
President
Took office
Left office
Party
Vice President
Term
1

Manuel L. Quezon
November 15, 1935
August 1, 19441
Nacionalista
Sergio Osmeña
1

2
2

Sergio Osmeña
August 1, 1944
May 28, 1946
Nacionalista
vacant

3

Manuel Roxas
May 28, 1946
July 4, 1946²
Liberal
Elpidio Quirino
3
1 Died due to tuberculosis at Saranac Lake, New York.
² End of Commonwealth government, independent Republic inaugurated. Quezon Administration (1935–1944)[edit]

Manuel L. Quezon, president from 1935–44
In 1935 Quezon won the Philippine's first national presidential election under the banner of the Nacionalista Party. He obtained nearly 68% of the vote against his two main rivals, Emilio Aguinaldo and Bishop Gregorio Aglipay. Quezon was inaugurated in November 1935. He is recognized as the second President of the Philippines. When Manuel L. Quezon was inaugurated President of the Philippines in 1935, he became the first Filipino to head a government of the Philippines since Emilio Aguinaldo and the Malolos Republic in 1898. However, in January 2008, Congressman Rodolfo Valencia of Oriental Mindoro filed a bill seeking instead to declare General Miguel Malvar as the second Philippine President, having directly succeeded Aguinaldo in 1901.[c] Quezon had originally been barred by the Philippine constitution from seeking re-election. However, in 1940, constitutional amendments were ratified allowing him to seek re-election for a fresh term ending in 1943. In the 1941 presidential elections, Quezon was re-elected over former Senator Juan Sumulong with nearly 82% of the vote. In a notable humanitarian act, Quezon, in cooperation with U.S. High Commissioner Paul V. McNutt, facilitated the entry into the Philippines of Jewish refugees fleeing fascistregimes in Europe. Quezon was also instrumental in promoting a project to resettle the refugees in Mindanao. Quezon suffered from tuberculosis and spent his last years in a ‘cure cottage’ in Saranac Lake, NY, where he died on August 1, 1944. He was initially buried in Arlington National Cemetery. His body was later carried by the USS Princeton and re-interred in Manila at the Manila North Cemetery before being moved to Quezon City within the monument at the Quezon Memorial Circle. Osmeña Administration (1944–1946)[edit]

Sergio Osmeña, president from 1944–46
Osmeña became president of the Commonwealth on Quezon's death in 1944. He returned to the Philippines the same year with General Douglas MacArthur and the liberation forces. After the war Osmeña restored the Commonwealth government and the various executive departments. He continued the fight for Philippine independence. For the presidential election of 1946 Osmeña refused to campaign, saying that the Filipino people knew of his record of 40 years of honest and faithful service. Nevertheless, he was defeated by Manuel Roxas, who won 54% of the vote and became the first president of the independent Republic of the Philippines. Roxas Administration (May 28, 1946 – July 4, 1946)[edit]

Manuel Roxas, last president of the Commonwealth from May 28, 1946 – July 4, 1946 Roxas served as the President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines in a brief period, from his subsequent election on May 28, 1946 to July 4, 1946, the scheduled date of the proclamation of Philippine Independence. Roxas prepared the groundwork for the advent of a free and independent Philippines, assisted by the Congress (reorganized May 25, 1946), with Senator José Avelino as the Senate President and Congressman Eugenio Pérez as the House of Representatives Speaker. On June 3, 1946, Roxas appeared for the first time before the joint session of the Congress to deliver his first state of the nation address. Among other things, he told the members of the Congress the grave problems and difficulties the Philippines...
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