Fiji Water - Triple Bottom Line Analysis

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  • Topic: Sustainability, Marketing, Bottled water
  • Pages : 2 (659 words )
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  • Published : April 3, 2013
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The Triple Bottom Line Analysis/Evaluation of Fiji Water:
Fiji Water and Economical Sustainability
Market Trends: The bottled waters market has observed a major growth in the last decades thanks to changes in consumers’ minds. The water products are now preferred to the Sparkling (Sodas) substitutes because customers are being more health-conscious and socially aware. The major threat for Fiji Water came after their attempt to enter the UK’s market, when the Tap Water vs. Bottled Water emerged and started to spread across the globe. Sales and Revenues: Profits and sales have been growing at an impressive pace during the last 13 years of Natural Waters of Viti Ltd.’s existence. Indeed, in 2008, the company was leading the imported bottled waters market in the United States (second market for bottled water worldwide with a 30.7% market share). Their products are now sold in the most famous luxury hotels and restaurants in New-York City and consumed by famous actors and celebrities. This was made possible by a successful and cost-effective marketing campaign. The luxury markets, by offering higher margins, ensure sustainable revenues. Recommendation: One solution the company could consider, which is a common practice among multinationals, is to diversify its revenue sources as well as reducing its transportation costs (reducing its carbon footprint) by acquiring other suppliers offshore. They could make an offer to buy a factory in the US or Australia. Fiji Water and Environmental Sustainability

Fiji Water has set the objective to go carbon negative. Its means that their goal was not only to achieve eco-effectiveness (not harmful anymore), but also to have a positive impact on the environment (by growing trees and restoring lands). They did a good job in that area, reducing packaging, using 50% renewables and recycling bottles. Nevertheless, the issue of transportation always undermined the firm’s green initiatives; as Rob Knox ironically said in his article:...
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