Figures of Sp

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Simile: A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two different things, usually by employing the words "like" or "as"... "if" or "than" are also used though less commonly. A simile differs from a metaphor in that the latter compares two unlike things by saying that the one thing is the other thing. Using 'like'

A simile can explicitly provide the basis of a comparison or leave this basis implicit. In the implicit case, characterized by the use of 'like' to connect the two ideas, the simile leaves an audience to determine for themselves which features of the target are being predicated: it is also a kind of sentence that uses as or like to connect the words being compared it can be an idioms seldom ex: * She is like a candy so sweet.

* For He is like a refiner's fire.
* Her eyes twinkled like stars.
* He fights like a lion.
* He runs like a cheetah.
* She is cute like a rose.
* Gwen is like a lion when she gets angry.
Using 'as'
The use of as makes the simile explicit, by clearly stating the feature predicated of the target: * She walks as gracefully as a cat.
* He was as hungry as a lion.
* He was as mean as a bull.
* She wasn't as smart as Vanessa.
* Spider was fat as an elephant
Metaphor: Metaphor is when you use two nouns and compare or contrast them to one another. Unlike simile, you don't use "like" or "as" in the comparison. * I am a rainbow
"I am a rainbow" is a example of metaphor because it is comparing two nouns, a person, and a rainbow, but does not use like or as. * I am not Anger
"I am not anger" is an example of metaphor because it is contrasting two nouns. * "Life is a journey. Enjoy the Ride."
* Personification: In writing, personification means giving an inanimate (non-living) object human traits and qualities, such as emotions, desires, sensations, physical gestures and speech. Examples are 'the leaves swayed in the wind', 'the ocean heaved a sigh' or 'the frowning cliff smiled at last'. The wind yells while blowing. Now, obviously the wind cannot yell only people can. This is what is called Personification.  Examples:

* The stars danced playfully in the moonlit sky.
* She did not realize that the opportunity was knocking at her door. * The thunder grumbled like an old man.
* At precisely 6:30 am my alarm clock sprang to life.
* The fire ran wild.
* The tornado ran through town without a care.
* My life came screeching to a halt.
* Time creeps up on you.
* The news took me by surprise.
* The tsunami raced towards the coastline.
* The sky smiled, as the horrible clouds raced across it, out of its way. Onomatopoeia: Onomatopoeia is a word that imitates or suggests the source of the sound that it describes. Onomatopœia (as an uncountable noun) refers to the property of such words. Common occurrences of onomatopœias include animal noises, such as "oink" or "meow" or "roar" or "chirp". Onomatopœias are not the same across all languages; they conform to some extent to the broader linguistic system they are part of; hence the sound of a clock may be tick tock in English, dī dā in Mandarin, or katchin katchin in Japanese. Oxymoron: Oxymoron is special type of Antithesis, whereby two contradictory qualities are predicted at once of the same thing.

Examples: 
• She accepted it as the kind cruelty of surgeon’s knife. • His honor rooted in dishonor stood.
• Faith unfaithful kept him falsely true.
• So innocent arch, so cunningly simple.
Antithesis: In Antithesis, a striking opposition or contrast of words or sentiments is made in the same sentence. It is employed to secure emphasis.

Examples: 

• Man proposes, but God disposes.
• Not that I loved Caesar less, but I loved Rome more.
• Speech is silver, but Silence is Gold.
• Many are called, but few are chosen.
• To err is human, but to forgive on divine.
Apostrophe: An...
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