Figurative Language Poetry Terms

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1.Apostrophe- the superscript sign used to indicate omission of a letter or letters from a word, possessive, case, or the plurals of numbers, letters, and abbreviations.

“Those lovers scorn whom that love doth possess?
Do they call virtue there, ungratefulness?”

Sir Philip Sidney, “Sonnet 31”

2.Conceit- an elaborate, fanciful metaphor.

“Our two souls therefore, which are one, though I must go, endure not yet a breach, but an expansion, like gold to aery thinness beat.”

John Donne, “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning”

3.Hyperbole- an extravagant statement or figure of speech not intended to be taken literally.

“I brought a heart into the room, but from the room I carried none with me.”

John Donne, “ The Broken Heart”

4.Image- a figure of speech.

“For he on honey-dew hath fed and drunk the milk of Paradise.”

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “ Kubla Khan”

5.Metaphor- a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance.

“Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold:
Then felt I like some watcher of the skies.”

John Keats, “ On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”

6.Oxymoron- a figure of speech by which a locution produces an incongruous, seemingly self-contradictory effect.

“Ride ten thousand days and nights
Till Age snow white hairs on thee”

John Donne, “Song”

7.Paradox- a statement or proposition that seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth.

“But am betroth'd unto your enemy; Divorce me, untie, or break that knot again”

John Donne, “Holy Sonnet 14”

8.Personification- giving human qualities, especially to inanimate objects.

“With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st the skies!”

Sir Philip Sidney, “Sonnet 31”

9.Simile- the figure of speech that...
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