Fiedler's Contingency Model

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Fiedler's Contingency Model
The question that might come to the mind of a person: What is your natural leadership style? Do you focus on completing tasks, or on building relationships with your team? Have you considered that this natural leadership style might be more suited to some situations or environments than it is to others? We can get answers through the leadership model. For that purpose we will be dealing with fielder leadership model. Understanding the Model:

 Here, "contingency" is a situation or event that's dependent on someone, or something else. The Fiedler Contingency Model was created in the mid-1960s by Fred Fiedler, a scientist who helped advance the study of personality and characteristics of leaders. The model states that there is no one best style of leadership. Instead, a leader's effectiveness is based on the situation. This is the result of two factors – "leadership style" and "situational favorableness" (later called "situational control"). Leadership Style:

Identifying leadership style is the first step in using the model. Fiedler believed that leadership style is fixed, and it can be measured using a scale he developed called Least-Preferred Co-Worker (LPC) Scale (as Figure 1). The scale asks you to think about the person who you've least enjoyed working with. This can be a person who you've worked with in your job, or in education or training. You then rate each factor based on this person and add up your scores. If your total score is high, you're likely to be a relationship-orientated leader. If your total score is low, you're more likely to be task-orientated leader. Figure 1: Least-Preferred Co-Worker Scale

Unfriendly| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Friendly| Unpleasant| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Pleasant| Rejecting| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Accepting| Tense| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Relaxed| Cold| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Warm| Boring| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Interesting| Backbiting| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Loyal| Uncooperative| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Cooperative| Hostile| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Supportive| Guarded| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Open| Insincere| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Sincere| Unkind| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Kind| Inconsiderate| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Considerate| Untrustworthy| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Trustworthy| Gloomy| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Cheerful| Quarrelsome| 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8| Harmonious| | | |

With the help of these three variables, eight combinations of group-task situations were constructed by Fiedler. These combinations were used to identify the style of the leader.(FIGURE BELOW)

Figure 1: Correlation between leader’s LPC scores and group effectiveness

1. The model says that task-oriented leaders usually view their LPCs more negatively, resulting in a lower score. Fiedler called these low LPC-leaders. 2. He said that low LPCs are very effective at completing tasks. They're quick to organize a group to get tasks and projects done. Relationship-building is a low priority. * However, relationship-oriented leaders usually view their LPCs more positively, giving them a higher score. These are high-LPC leaders. High LPCs focus more on personal connections, and they're good at avoiding and managing conflict. They're better able to make complex decisions. Situational Favorableness:

Next, to determine the "situational favorableness" of your particular situation. This depends on three distinct factors: * Leader-Member Relations – This is the level of trust and confidence that your team has in you. A leader who is more trusted and has more influence with the group is in a more favorable situation than a leader who is not trusted. * Task Structure – This refers to the type of task you're doing: clear and structured, or vague and unstructured. Unstructured tasks, or tasks...
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