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Rainwater Harvesting: Grab hold of Water Where it Falls!
Mrs. S.D. Khandagale , Mrs. V.A. Joshi
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Lecurer, Instrumentation Department V.P.M’s Polytechni, Thane, MS, India smita_khandagale@hotmail.com *

H.O.D, Instrumentation Department V.P.M’s Polytechnic, Thane, MS, India

Abstract
Till about thirty years back, the areas around our homes and offices used to be unpaved and the rain falling on these areas would percolate into the soil and remain there for being drawn through shallow open wells. With the proliferation of flat complexes, not only have these areas been paved and percolation of rainwater into the soil almost totally stopped, the quantity of water drawn from the soil below has increased manifold. Consequently open wells and not - so - deep bore wells started drying up. The reason is that no sincere attempt is made to replenish the ground water table with rainwater during the monsoon. The Rainwater harvesting is the simple collection or storing of water through scientific techniques from the areas where the rain falls. It involves utilization of rain water for the domestic or the agricultural purpose. The method of rain water harvesting has been into practice since ancient times. It is as far the best possible way to conserve water and awaken the society towards the importance of water. The method is simple and cost effective too. It is especially beneficial in the areas, which faces the scarcity of water. People usually make complaints about the lack of water. During the monsoons lots of water goes waste into the gutters. And this is when Rain water Harvesting proves to be the most effective way to conserve water. We can collect the rain water into the tanks and prevent it from flowing into drains and being wasted. It is practiced on the large scale in the metropolitan cities. Rain water harvesting comprises of storage of water and water recharging through the technical process

Introduction
It was very difficult to imagine few decades before that you will require to buy drinking. The use value of water was never undermined, but its about time that even its exchange value is given due importance. Fresh water today is a scarce resource, and it is being felt the world over. More than 2000 million people would live under conditions of high water stress by the year 2050, according to the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme), which warns water could prove to be a limiting factor for development in a number of regions in the world. About one-fifth of the world’s population lacks access to safe drinking water and with the present consumption patterns; two out of every three persons on the earth would live in water-stressed conditions by 2025. Around one-third of the world population now lives in countries with moderate to high water stress—where water consumption is more than 10% of the renewable fresh water supply, said the GEO (Global Environment Outlook) 2000, the UNEP’s millennium report. Pollution and scarcity of water resources and climate change would be the major emerging issues in the next century, said the report. These issues would be followed by problems of desertification and deforestation, poor governance at the national and global levels, the loss of biodiversity, and population growth, said the report - The Observer of Business and Politics, 12 October 1999.

The reality of water crisis cannot be ignored. India has been notorious of being poor in its management of water resources. The demand for water is already outstripping the supply. Majority of the population in the cities today are groundwater dependent. In spite of the municipal water supply, it is not surprising to find people using private tube wells to supplement their daily water needs. As a result, the groundwater table is falling at an alarming rate. Extraction of groundwater is being done unplanned and uncontrolled thus this has resulted in: Hydrological imbalance Deterioration in water quality Rise in...
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