Fetal Pig Dissection

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Mammalian and Human Organ System Differentiation During Fetal Pig Dissection

Abstract
This report represents an in depth biological study of the sus scrofa and its internal organs located in the ventral body cavity. The purpose of this lab is to compare and contrast the functions of organ systems of humans and fetal pigs, primarily those contained within the ventral body cavity, which includes both thoracic and abdominal cavities. Also, to implement new skills such as dissection and the use of a scalpel as well as other related tools and to attain the ability to locate the organs of the mammalian system and compare their location to that of human organs. Through the process of sus scrofa dissection, insights have been made into the comparison of biological structures between mammals-- particularly fetal pigs, and humans through study of the ventral cavity and the organs lying within. The aforementioned dissection, which was performed with the use of specialized tools such as the scalpel, has yielded fruitful results leading to a greater understanding of the functions of organ systems in other life forms; including the fetal pig. Due to the four-legged nature of the fetal pig, there have been several similarities and differences regarding the human race and the fetal pig. Firstly, the pig possesses a tail whereas humans do not. The second differences observed were the large distinctions in facial structure. The fetal pig, perhaps due to its linear body shape, possessed a thinner, more streamlined facial structure with large, upright ears, and an extended snout. Internally, the fetal pig and the human have been observed to have similar internal organ systems, with size as the major difference between the two. With this knowledge in mind, a better understanding of the differences and similarities between the biological structures of the human race and the animal kingdom has been attained for possible use in methods that could prove beneficial to both. Due to the great similarity between the functions of human organ systems, and animal organ systems, future developments in animal organ transplants are in sight, for the greater benefit of mankind. Submitted To: Mrs. Pellegrino

Submitted By: Johans Mascardo
Lab Partner(s): Derrick Porter
Date Performed: Monday, April 3, 2011
Date Due: Friday, April 8, 2011
Course Code: SBI3U1-07

Mammalian and Human Organ System Differentiation During Fetal Pig Dissection

Introduction
This report represents a study of the organ systems contained mostly within the ventral body cavity of a fetal pig through the method of dissection. Dissection provides valuable information pertaining to the importance and the primary functions of mammalian organ systems—particularly the circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems—in relation to humans. This lab provides a new, direct, and unique approach to studying the path of food towards digestion, the flow of blood through circulation, and the exchange of air during respiration. Also, due to the mammalian nature of the organs being studied, comparisons can be drawn to the organs of humans, whose own systems appear to be very similar both in shape and function. Locations of these organs are studied closely to provide insight on how they contribute to the effectiveness and efficiency of the system as a whole and to answer the question of whether or not this applies to humans as well. Purpose:

1. To Compare and Contrast the functions of organ systems of humans and fetal pigs, primarily those contained within the ventral body cavity, which includes both thoracic and abdominal cavities. 2. Implement new skills such as dissection and the use of a scalpel as well as other related tools. 3. To locate the organs of the mammalian system and compare their location to that of human organs.

Questions:
1. Are fetal pig and human internal systems different?
2. What skills were gained in the process of this lab?
3. What is the difference in...
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