Feminist Theorization on the Politics of Erasure and Exclusion, Exploitation and Opprerssion, and Marginalization and Bias Can Be Used to Understand the Place of Africa in International Relations Theory and Practice.

Topics: Feminism, Slavery, Capitalism Pages: 5 (1916 words) Published: June 30, 2013
TITLE:
FEMINIST THEORIZATION ON THE POLITICS OF ERASURE AND EXCLUSION, EXPLOITATION AND OPPRERSSION, AND MARGINALIZATION AND BIAS CAN BE USED TO UNDERSTAND THE PLACE OF AFRICA IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY AND PRACTICE. WITH GREAT DETAIL DISCUSS THE ABOVE STATEMENT WITH REGARD TO AFRICAS PLACE AND EXPERIENCE CHALLENGING PROMISE IN THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM.

Table of contents

Introduction.................................................Pg-3 Main Body
I.History of feminism...............................Pg3-4
II.Women’s history through oppression....Pg-5
III.Domestic labour in women’s oppression...Pg-6
Conclusion ...................................Pg-7
Bibliography.................................Pg-8

Introduction and history
Feminism as we know is a heated subject matter. By definition we can say, it is a compilation of beliefs and ideas meant for establishing, defending and equal political economic and social rights of women around the globe. The words “feminism” first appeared in France and Netherlands in the late 1870s from the French philosopher Charles Fourier. He is the one who people thought might have coined the term. Soon after “feminist theory” which emerged from leading feminist movements aimed at the nature of gender inequality social experiences and roles. It was Catapulted into the lime light by the injustices of women been carried in the early 17th century to 19th century, which am going to parley about. Feminist activism is often divided into two periods, the late nineteenth century(known as first wave) and the 1960s and 1970s (the second wave). Both periods led to important changes in the levels of rights and freedoms women now have, at least in some countries and how issues of gender are understood in different societies. The first wave was a political movement aimed at challenging the lack of rights for women in the public sphere. The right to vote, own property and obtain an education were vital demands of the first feminist movements. The campaigns of this period were based on important feminist theoretical texts, which captured the incompatibility of modern democracy with the confinement of women into the private sphere. The focus on the private sphere brought a new range of issues into activism and the development of feminist ideas. The new areas included sexuality, reproduction, domestic labour and domestic violence. Again, during the second wave a rich body of feminist theoretical ideas developed, closely linked to the activities of the Women’s Liberation Movement. These periods led to an increased presence for the “woman question” in wider social and political thought (Jackson, 1998; Okin, 1992).An important target in each wave was highlighting the inability of established social and political thought to respond to the oppression of women. Feminist thought, has always sought to engage with and reinterpret the foundations of the theoretical frameworks it coexists with and at times drawn from. First-wave feminists challenged women’s apparent failure to display the values associated with human nature; the excuse used at the time to justify the lack of rights women had in areas such as property and suffrage. Second-wave feminists went on to challenge the masculine values embedded in how social and political thought approached many issues. In spite of everything, a crime against a woman was something more than a fault, misdeed or transgression; it was act of oppression against women. What made a man so different too a woman? Some argue they are biologically wired to be kind and soft spoken others say it’s based on false pretence and used as marketing gimmick to push women to lowering paying jobs. Feminist scholars no doubt took to the books to understand, reasons to why, women are subjected lower paying wages even though they were to take up the same post in an institution with the opposite sex, a man. Other familiar cases were to why they couldn’t vote or own...
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