Feminism in America - a Study Guide

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Justice Simonetti
APUSH
The Suffrage Movement and New Feminism
February 27, 2013

Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions (1920)| * Delivered by Elizabeth Cady Stanton to an audience of about 200 women and 40 men * Resolutions * Laws that conflict with the happiness of a women are invalid * Laws that prevent a women from occupying a station are invalid * A woman is a man’s equal as dictated by god * Women should know the laws that restrain them * Men should be held to the same moral standards as women * It is the duty of women to win their rights| The Suffrage Movement Leading up to the Ratification of the 19th Amendment| * The Declaration of Sentiments (See above) * Woman’s rights convention in Syracuse in 1856 * Lead by Susan B Anthony * Minor V. Happersett * Rejected claims of suffrage from 14th amendment * Caused suffragettes to turn from courts to states and congress * Admission of Wyoming (1890) * Allowed women to vote * First state to allow this * By 1900, Colorado, Utah, Idaho allowed women to vote * Teddy Roosevelt * Roosevelt’s party was the first major political party to endorse female suffrage * Marked a change in attitudes towards the feminist movement * Ratification of the 19th Amendment * Originally drafted in by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (originally submitted 1872) * (August 1920) two thirds majority in congress finally received|

Feminism (General)| * Historians divide the movement into two general time periods: the “first wave” (19th century) and the “second wave” (late 20th century) * Both “waves,” in part, drew inspiration from other social movements * Abolitionism -> “first wave” * Civil Rights -> “second wave” * Split feminist ideals * Female military service * The right to maternity leave and other “special protections” for women * Universal feminist ideals * The right to chose abortion * The...
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