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Many people may be unfamiliar with the term femicide, because it is not a very common word, but there are many people fighting to include this concept in every person’s vocabulary. Diana E.H. Russell and Roberta A. Harmes hope that in writing “Femicide in Global Perspective” they demonstrate to researchers, theoreticians, and activists, in all parts of the world, the importance of using femicide instead of homicide (Russell and Harmes 2001: 3). The authors provide a good definition of what femicide is, “a hate crime that involves rape, torture, mutilation, etc., but ultimately results in death, one can see the crudeness of this behavior and the seriousness of the issue.” Throughout their work, they do a good job of explaining the importance of adapting to this concept instead of continuing with an incorrect perception of this hate crime. There are both positives and negatives in this work, but for the most part, the authors provides good positive information that will lead to a better understanding of the severity of femicide. Throughout each of the chapters in the anthology, they present different articles from places all over the world, in which the viewpoints are similar. After presenting the information, the authors support it by providing graphs and statistics. A femicide is a hate crime that involves rape, torture, mutilation, sexual slavery, sexual abuse, physical and emotional battery, but femicide actually means when these forms of sexist terrorism result in death. One of the authors major goals is to show the importance of defining femicide as the killing of females by males, not only as a homicide case, but as a hate crime because they are female (4). In response to this idea, they decided to include only those articles in which the term femicide is used. By providing only those articles the authors hopes that they will demonstrate the importance of using femicide over homicide as well as the severity of femicide, its global dimensions, and the need to...
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