Feedlot

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1. Augustine

Lorie Augustine
September 19, 2011
English 122

Corn is it hurting our livestock

Corn is commonly used as feed grain in beef cattle diets throughout the United States. Cows see very little grass now days in their life span. They supported with the diet of corn which causes them to become fat and bloated and become depended on antibiotic. The drug causes the cows to developed liver damages. So if it causes health risk to the cows imagine what it does to our health Most feedlot uses corn as the main supply for feeding their cows. It is an absurdity in the way modern feedlots work: Cows are ruminants, which is to say, they’ve evolved to exist on grass. But cows in industrial feedlots are fed diets that consistently fed 75% of corn. Corn is much denser than grass (which requires less land so cattle can be fed in smaller area). Corn has little protein and is rich and starchy, which causes cows to become bloated. Since cows did not evolve to exist on corn, feeding them such grain-heavy diets can cause health problems like bloated and acidosis. To keep them healthy, modern cows receive high doses of antibiotics—a practice which has the potential to lower these medicines’ future effectiveness by promoting the development of resistant superbug. Once the cows start eating the (corn), they are more vulnerable. They’re stressed so they more defenseless to all the different diseases cows get. But specifically they get bloat, which is just a horrible thing to happen. They stop ruminating. For example, you have an image of a cow

On grass ruminating, this is chewing its cud and burping a lot. In fact, a lot of greenhouse gases come out of the stock as a methane emerges from their mouth as they eructate—it’s a technical term. And they bring down saliva in this process, and it keeps their stomach vey base rather than acid. So you put in the corn and this layer of slime forms over the rumen (stomach). Just picture the...
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