Federal Expansion

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 332
  • Published : July 2, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
What is Federal Expansion? Today people see this as something that they believe is a government trying to control what it is that they do, what most do not know is that it is something at makes things better. In order to get a somewhat better understanding we must first know what it means. So we look at the definition of Expansion meaning to increase something in size, and the definition of Federal “being a form of government in which a union of states recognizes the sovereignty of a central authority while retaining certain residual powers of government”(dictionary.com). So to answer the question Federal Expansion is something that the government has had control over and increased its size. An example of this is a landmark case from 1973 Roe vs. Wade in which the United States Supreme Court made a decision on the issue of Abortion. Many people today have no clue as to how some Federal Expansions had affected them today. The year was 1954 and back then public schools were segregated, meaning that whites went to one school while blacks went to other school. There was no inter mixing of the schools. In 1951 a class action law suit was filed in United States District Court of Kansas, against the Topeka, Kansas Board of Education. It call for the school district to reverse its policy of segregation. This case was later know as Brown vs. Board of Education. A law from 1879 allowed the State of Kansas to separate the schools, but it was not require. Oliver Brown the named plaintiff an African American did not believe it to be fair for his child who was in the third grade should have to walk 6 blocks to catch a bus to go to a black school over a mile away, all the while there was a school be it an all white school only 7 blocks from their home. The district courts found in favor in the Board of Education upholding a state law that was passes in 1896 saying “separate but equal” keeping the schools segregated, this was eventually overruled by the US Supreme Court...
tracking img