Feasibility

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  • Topic: Banana, Clothing, Fiber
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  • Published : April 26, 2013
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Saint Paul University Quezon City

Banana Fiber Clothing
A Feasibility Study Presented to the Faculty
of the Tourism Department
Saint Paul University Quezon City

In Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements
for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Tourism Management

by:
Besmonte, Armi Jen
Sto. Domingo, Allen Marie
Villarama, Katrina May

April 2013

Introduction

Background of the Study
Bananas are known as a delicious and energy boosting fruit. Grown in 129 countries around the world, bananas are, in fact, the fourth most important global food crop.But aside from food, this large perennial herb gives more of itself to the benefit of mankind and the environment. From its roots to the tip of its leaves, you will be amazed to discover the wonders of the banana. Its stem or trunk can even be transformed into a fabulously elegant clothing material. A hundred and twenty nine countries in the world grow bananas, the fourth most important global food crop. This large perennial plant is indeed a very generous provider for mankind. From its roots to the tip of its leaves, banana is sagging with so many benefits that mankind can take advantage of. Its fruits are high in potassium content, vitamins C and B6, manganese, fiber, and other nutrients; its leaves are good for wrapping food; while its roots are said to be effective against parasitic worms and can relieve bronchitis. Banana trunks or stems also make good clothing material, aside from being a good source of animal feed.

You can cut a fabric out of the banana trunk – and this is not even a new discovery. If we may go back to history lane, Japanese cultivators in the 1200’s used to produce textiles for kimonos and other traditional clothes from specific banana varieties. But since extraction of the banana fiber was done manually and the process quite tedious, production of banana-made clothes did not make it to the mainstream of commerce. Besides, conventional fibers, like cotton, silk, and man-made fibers were readily available to fill the market’s need.

Boil (Idea generation)
BanaFiber’s Couture has developed a product that is made of banana fiber which produces a highly sorbent material. Its texture is smoother than clothes made of cotton. It is environmental friendly that is fashionable and comfortable. Discovered Idea about Banana Fiber:

A natural sorbent
Banana fibers in their natural state produce a highly sorbent material. The key factor is the high porosity and natural capillary action of the fiber, allowing it to absorb oil. Banana fiber is a super-sorbent, in that less fiber product is needed to remediate any spillage. Banana fibers can be used in sorbent socks, pillows and booms, or as loose fiber to clean up land-based spills.

A base material for bioremediation and recycling

Organic contamination is frequently treated through 'bioremediation', a method that employs bacteria to 'eat' the contamination. In order for these bacteria to survive within the contaminated environment, they must be provided with a natural substrate material on which they will thrive. Banana fiber provides this medium and can be used in the remediation industry as a natural bioremediation agent.

A base material for the paper and pulp industry

The use of banana pseudostem has been investigated for the production of craft cellulose, to be whitened for use in the manufacture of special paper used in the restoration of documents. The raw material used, at nearly 94% humidity, is obtained from commercial banana plantations. Paper made out of banana fiber is reported to be of high strength and is used to make tea bags and currency notes.

A raw material in handicrafts and textiles
A variety of products have been made from banana fibers in the Philippines. The banana fibers were reported to be elegant and highly versatile. As they do not crumple easily,...
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