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Safeguarding the wellbeing of children and young people.
1 Policies and procedures for safeguarding and child protection in England and Wales are the result of the Children Act 1989. The Children Act 2004 introduced further changes to the way the child protection system is structured and organised. The Children Act 1989 makes it clear to anyone who works with children or young people what their duties and responsibilities are in a childcare setting and how they must work together with other practitioners in the event of allegations of child abuse. The Children Act 2004 came into place as it was proved that services were not working together or communicating, therefore lots of vulnerable children were victims of child abuse which could have been avoided if services communicated and worked together. The Vetting and Barring Scheme, introduced in October 2009, was introduced to stop unsuitable people being able to work with children. Anyone who works with children must have a CRB check, to keep track on a person’s criminal record, so if anything comes up, they will not be allowed to work with children. Safeguarding is not just protecting children and young people from neglect or any kind of direct abuse, it is also about doing anything to avoid dangers or hazards which could cause accidents, protecting children against crime and bullying and promoting a healthy lifestyle. National and local policies state that it is vital that someone working in a childcare setting can recognise if a child is at risk of harm due to vulnerability. This is important as the sooner a practitioner can recognise any signs or indicators of abuse, the sooner this can be dealt with. If somebody who is working in a childcare setting, suspects a child is being abused, they must follow their safeguarding policy for their setting. Every childcare setting’s policy must include information about health and safety, outings, child protection, performing personal care and when visitors come to...
Laura Roberts CYP Core 3.3 Student Number: 40793041
Safeguarding the wellbeing of children and young people.
1 Policies and procedures for safeguarding and child protection in England and
Wales are the result of the Children Act 1989. The Children Act 2004 introduced
further changes to the way the child protection system is structured and organised.
The Children Act 1989 makes it clear to anyone who works with children or young
people what their duties and responsibilities are in a childcare setting and how they
must work together with other practitioners in the event of allegations of child abuse.
The Children Act 2004 came into place as it was proved that services were not
working together or communicating, therefore lots of vulnerable children were victims
of child abuse which could have been avoided if services communicated and worked
together.
The Vetting and Barring Scheme, introduced in October 2009, was introduced to
stop unsuitable people being able to work with children. Anyone who works with
children must have a CRB check, to keep track on a person’s criminal record, so if
anything comes up, they will not be allowed to work with children.
Safeguarding is not just protecting children and young people from neglect or any
kind of direct abuse, it is also about doing anything to avoid dangers or hazards
which could cause accidents, protecting children against crime and bullying and
promoting a healthy lifestyle.
National and local policies state that it is vital that someone working in a childcare
setting can recognise if a child is at risk of harm due to vulnerability. This is important
as the sooner a practitioner can recognise any signs or indicators of abuse, the
sooner this can be dealt with. If somebody who is working in a childcare setting,
suspects a child is being abused, they must follow their safeguarding policy for their
setting. Every childcare setting’s policy must include information about health and
safety, outings, child protection, performing personal care and when visitors come to
the setting. To also safeguard children, regular risk assessments must be carried
out, to make sure there are no potential hazards or threats which could potentially
harm a child.
When there is a serious case review, where if a child dies or is seriously injured,
caused by abuse or neglect, the local authority children’s service and also the police
will be informed. Other agencies may also be called out such as health or education
services if needed. It is important to share information between practitioners and
communicate with each other to inform each other of any vital or new information,
especially about situations like this.
All personal information about children in the setting is strictly kept confidential. The
information is used only as needed, kept secure and up to date. This follows the
Data Protection Act 1998, which states that any information must be kept in a safe
way that ensures no other people can get hold of it.
2 Safeguarding children is important as child abuse and neglect by a child’s own
parents or carers happens very regularly, and some children may even be seriously