FDR's Policies: Preparing America for a Future of Democracy

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The Great Depression brought not only a fall in America’s economy, but also an opportunity for the government to intervene and provide relief to the ailed. The economic downfall had to be fixed and during FDR’s presidency this occurred. Even unemployed and underpaid employees saw an improvement in the working conditions, which was a goal of the laborers’ struggle for a while. The administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s proved to be effective for this time period because FDR’s policies put the government in direct involvement with the economy by increasing its power, and used the New Deal’s three R’s: relief, recovery, and reform, to attempt to pull America out of the Great Depression. Unlike Hoover, FDR believed that the government should provide direct relief to the economy. He put an emphasis on simulating the economy through an increase in deficit spending. This put Six Billion dollars into the economy that was used for public works and reform projects (Doc D). He also issued a lot of Acts and created a lot of organizations, which later became known as his Alphabet Agencies (Doc C). All these Agencies, including the NIRA, WPA, and the FERA, greatly increased the power of the federal government by providing many jobs and decreasing the number of unemployed people during the Great Depression (Doc J). Roosevelt’s first point to his New Deal was relief. He first wanted to help the Americans who had suffered the most during the Great Depression. To provide this relief, he created groups like the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Projects Administration to provide numerous jobs to the unemployed. This gave a quick relief. This was greatly effective because it took more than 3 million people off the streets and put them to work. Another plus to this was that he also included the African Americans in his policies by giving them jobs as well (Doc I). This way, the suffering of the needy was relieved. The next R to the New Deal was recovery, meaning that...
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