Fdi Introduction and History

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CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

Over the past two decades, many countries around the world have experienced substantial growth in their economies, with even faster growth in international transactions, especially in the form of foreign direct investment (FDI). The share of net FDI in world GDP has grown five-fold through the eighties and the nineties, making the causes and consequences of FDI and economic growth a subject of ever-growing interest. This report attempts to make a contribution in this context, by analyzing the existence and nature of causalities, if any, between FDI and economic growth. It uses as its focal point India, where growth of economic activities and FDI has been one of the most pronounced.

DEFINITION OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT :-

Foreign direct investment (FDI) is defined as "investment made to acquire lasting interest in enterprises operating outside of the economy of the investor”. The FDI relationship, consists of a parent enterprise and a foreign affiliate which together form a transnational corporation (TNC). In order to qualify as FDI the investment must afford the parent enterprise control over its foreign affiliate. The UN defines control in this case as owning 10% or more of the ordinary shares or voting power of an incorporated firm or its equivalent for an unincorporated firm.

HISTORY OF FDI IN INDIA.

At the time of independence, the attitude towards foreign capital was one of fear and suspicion. This was natural on account of the previous exploitative role played by it in ‘draining away’ resources from this country.

The suspicion and hostility found expression in the Industrial Policy of 1948 which, though recognizing the role of private foreign investment in the country, emphasized that its regulation was necessary in the national interest. Because of this attitude expressed in the 1948 resolution, foreign capitalists got dissatisfied and as a result, the flow of imports of capital goods got obstructed. As a result, the prime minister had to give following assurances to the foreign capitalists in 1949:

1. No discrimination between foreign and Indian capital:-
The government o India will not differentiate between the foreign and Indian capital. The implication was that the government would not place any restrictions or impose any conditions on foreign enterprise which were not applicable to similar Indian enterprises.

2. Full opportunities to earn profits:-
The foreign interests operating in India would be permitted to earn profits without subjecting them to undue controls. Only such restrictions would be imposed which also apply to the Indian enterprises.

3. Gurantee of compensation:-
If and when foreign enterprises are compulsorily acquired, compensation will be paid on a fair and equitable basis as already announced in government’s statement of policy.

Though the Prime Minister stated that the major interest in ownership and effective control of an undertaking should be in Indian hands, he gave assurance that there would be “no hard and fast rule in this matter.”

By a declaration issued on June 2, 1950, the government assured the foreign capitalists that they can remit the he foreign investments made by them in the country after January 1, 1950. in addition, they were also allowed to remit whatever investment of profit and taken place.

Despite the above assurances, foreign capital in the requisite quantity did now flow into India during the period of the First plan. The atmosphere of suspicion had not changed substantially. However, the policy statement of the Prime Minister issued in 1949 and continued practically unchanged in the 1956 Industrial Policy Resolution, had opened up immense fields to foreign participation. In addition, the trends towards liberalization grew slowly and gradually more strong and the role of foreign investment grew more and more important.

The government relaxed its policy concerning majority ownership in several...
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