Fdi in India

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Foreign direct investment (FDI) is direct investment into production or business in a country by a company in another country, either by buying a company in the target country or by expanding operations of an existing business in that country. Foreign direct investment is done for many reasons including to take advantage of cheaper wages or for special investment privileges such as tax exemptions offered by the country as an incentive to gain tariff-free access to the markets of the country or the region. Foreign direct investment is in contrast to portfolio investment which is a passive investment in the securities of another country such as stocks and bonds. Two Basic types

1. Horizon FDI arises when a firm duplicates its home country-based activities at the same value chain stage in a host country through FDI. Horizontal FDI decreases international trade as the product of them is usually aimed at host country; the two other types generally act as a stimulus for it. 2. Vertical FDI takes place when a firm through FDI moves upstream or downstream in different value chains i.e., when firms perform value-adding activities stage by stage in a vertical fashion in a host country. Horizontal FDI decreases international trade as the product of them is usually aimed at host country; the two other types generally act as a stimulus for it.

FDI INFLOWS IN INDIA IN POST REFORM ERA

India’s economic reforms way back in 1991 has generated strong interest in foreign investors and turning India into one of the favourite destinations for global FDI flows. UNCTAD’s76 World Investment Report, 2005 considers India the 2nd most attractive destination among the TNCS. The positive perceptions among investors as a result of strong economic fundamentals driven by 18 years of reforms have helped FDI inflows grow significantly in India. The FDI inflows grow at about 20 times since the opening up of the economy to foreign investment. India received maximum amount of FDI from developing economiesFurther, the explosive growth of FDI gives opportunities to Indian industry for technological upgradation, gaining access to global managerial skills and practices, optimizing utilization of human and natural resources and competing internationally with higher efficiency. Most importantly FDI is central for India’s integration into global production chains which involves production by MNCs spread across locations all over the world.

TRENDS AND PATTERNS OF FDI FLOW IN INDIA

Economic reforms taken by Indian government in 1991 makes the country as one of the prominent performer of global economies by placing the country as the 4th largest and the 2nd fastest growing economy in the world. India also ranks as the 11th largest economy in terms of industrial output and has the 3rd largest pool of scientific and technical manpower. Continued economic liberalization since 1991 and its overall direction remained the same over the years irrespective of the ruling party moved the economy towards a market – based system from a closed economy characterized by extensive regulation, protectionism, public ownership which leads to pervasive corruption and slow growth from 1950s until 1990s. In fact, India’s economy has been growing at a rate of more than 9% for three running years and has seen a decade of 7 plus per cent growth. The exports in 2008 were $175.7 bn and imports were $287.5 bn. India’s export has been consistently rising, covering 81.3% of its imports in 2008, up from 66.2% in 1990-91. Since independence, India’s BOP on its current account has been negative. Since 1996-97, its overall BOP has been positive, largely on account of increased FDI and deposits from Non – Resident Indians (NRIs), and commercial borrowings. The fiscal deficit has come down from 4.5 per cent in 2003-04 to 2.7 per cent in 2007-08 and revenue deficit from 3.6 per cent to 1.1 per cent in 2007-08.As a result, India’s foreign exchange reserves...
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