Fault Tree

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Reliability engineering, Risk assessment, Fault tree analysis
  • Pages : 169 (44608 words )
  • Download(s) : 38
  • Published : May 9, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Version 1.1

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Prepared for NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance NASA Headquarters Washington, DC 20546

August, 2002

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Version 1.1

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications
NASA Project Coordinators: Dr. Michael Stamatelatos, NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Mr. José Caraballo, NASA Langley Research Center

Authors: NASA Dr. Michael Stamatelatos, NASA HQ, OSMA Lead Author: Dr. William Vesely, SAIC Contributing Authors (listed in alphabetic order): Dr. Joanne Dugan, University of Virginia Mr. Joseph Fragola, SAIC Mr. Joseph Minarick III, SAIC Mr. Jan Railsback, NASA JSC

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Version 1.1

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Acknowledgements The project coordinators and the authors express their gratitude to NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) management (Dr. Michael Greenfield, Deputy Associate Administrator and Dr. Peter Rutledge, Director of Enterprise Safety and Mission Assurance) and to Mr. Frederick Gregory, NASA Deputy Administrator, for their support and encouragement in developing this document. The authors also owe thanks to a number of reviewers who provided constructive criticism.

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Version 1.1

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications
Foreword
NASA has been a leader in most technologies it has employed in its programs over the years. One of the important NASA objectives is now to add Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to its repertoire of expertise in proven methods to reduce technological and programmatic risk. Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is one of the most important logic and probabilistic techniques used in PRA and system reliability assessment today. Methods to perform risk and reliability assessment in the early 1960s originated in US aerospace and missile programs. Fault tree analysis is such an example that was quite popular in the mid sixties. Early in the Apollo project the question was asked about the probability of successfully sending astronauts to the moon and returning them safely to Earth. A risk, or reliability, calculation of some sort was performed and the result was a mission success probability that was unacceptably low. This result discouraged NASA from further quantitative risk or reliability analysis until after the Challenger accident in 1986. Instead, NASA decided to rely on the use of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) and other qualitative methods for system safety assessments. After the Challenger accident, the importance of PRA and FTA in systems risk and reliability analysis was realized and its use at NASA has begun to grow. The nuclear industry began to utilize probabilistic risk assessment to assess safety following the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. In 1981, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued the Fault Tree Handbook, NUREG-0492. Over the past two decades, this document has become the leading technical information source on how FTA should be performed. Although originally intended for nuclear power applications, the Fault Tree Handbook has been extensively used in all fields where this powerful systems analysis methodology was applied. Over the past two decades, probabilistic risk assessment and its underlying techniques, including FTA, has become a useful and respected methodology for safety assessment. Because of its logical, systematic and comprehensive approach, PRA and FTA have been repeatedly proven Foreword

Fault Tree Handbook with Aerospace Applications

Version 1.1

capable of uncovering design and operational weaknesses that escaped even some of the best deterministic safety and engineering experts. This methodology showed that it was very important to examine not only low-probability and...
tracking img