Fast Food Feast - Mcdonald's Versus Whataburger

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Fast Food Feast-McDonald’s versus Whataburger
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Fast Food Feast - McDonald’s versus Whataburger
Operation and Supply chain management (OSCM) is one of the foundations that successful businesses count on to provide a competitive advantage within their industry. The goal of OSCM is to develop and maintain a system that effectively and efficiently manages the flow of raw material resources into useful end products for consumer use (Chase, 2006). In the fast food industry this process takes center stage in maintaining competitive pricing. A review of the production process in two national chains, Whataburger and McDonald’s, showcases each chain’s approaches to OSCM. Observed Production Processes

McDonald’s restaurant places its focus on quick turnaround times for efficiency and cost savings. McDonald's mission statement is “to be our customers’ favorite place and way to eat. By lowering the unit cost per item and establishing a customer flow process that increases the volume of units sold, McDonald’s can maintain its dollar menu items and low prices (McDonald’s, 2012). The production process of McDonald's is straightforward and all McDonalds follow the same process with employee training via videos on customer service and the food prep process. The restaurant makes use of sophisticated technology and prepackaged pre-cut produce to reduce prep times. Each shift has certain cleaning tasks to complete to maintain the food prep area and safety standards. (McDonald’s, 2012). Whataburger

The focus at Whataburger is on freshness and a burger it takes two hands to hold. The mission statement is the same as it originally was: to serve a burger so big that it took two hands to hold and so good that with one bite customers would say, “What a burger!’’(Whataburger 2012). Whataburger uses the latest technology but preserves the importance of the customer and made to order food. Identify the customer expectations for the service and product McDonalds

The customer expectations for McDonalds are based on speedy service and good prices. The fast food chain has a value menu with items for one dollar during all meal times. Customers expect quick delivery of their meal whether they drive through or dine inside. Whataburger

Whataburger patrons expect a big burger that is made just for them when they order it. While time of delivery does matter, the experience is more about getting a large burger just the way they want it. Consumers where are not as concerned about a dollar menu. Seven Major Questions

How are in-store orders taken?
The McDonald’s fast food chain has multiple cashiers where orders are placed face to face and entered via computerized cash registers. The cashiers transmit the orders electronically to a screen in the food prep area, with in store orders are identified from drive through orders. Once the order has been completed, the cashier clears that order when the customer is handed the food. Whataburger also uses electronic screens in the food prep area that receive the order information from the cashier at the counter. Orders are numbered and the customer is given a number to place on his or her table. Whataburger actually has an intermediate server who delivers the finished order to dine in patrons at their tables and offers condiments for their meal. Are the hamburgers prepared to order, or are they prepared ahead of time and delivered from a storage bin? McDonald’s hamburgers are frozen patties to ensure consistency of size and appearance. McDonald’s cooks the patties in batches and place them in temperature controlled warmer bins. Each bins holds one batch and a timer is placed per bin to regulate times according to OSHA standards (McDonald’s, 2012). During peak times, a set quantity of burgers are prepared and prepackaged ahead of time and placed on a temperature regulated delivery rack. Whataburger hamburgers are...
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