Fashion: Celebrity Culture

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Fashion is everywhere. It is one of the main ways in which we present ourselves to others, signaling what we want to communicate about our sexuality, wealth, professionalism, subcultural and political allegiances, social status, even our mood. It is also a global industry with huge economic, political and cultural impact on the lives of all of us who make, sell, wear or even just watch fashion.  Fashion: the Key Concepts presents a clear introduction to the complex world of fashion. The aim throughout is to present a comprehensive but also accessible and provocative analysis. Readers will discover how the fashion industry is structured and how it thinks, the links between catwalk, celebrity branding, media promotion and mainstream retail, how clothes mean different things in different parts of the world, and how popular culture influences fashion and how fashion shapes global culture. 

When, how and why do clothes become fashion? Fashion is more than mere clothing. It is a moment of invention, a distillation of desire, a reflection of a zeitgeist. It is also a business relying on an intricate network of manufacture, marketing and retail. 

Fashion is both medium and message but it does not explain itself. It requires language and images for its global mediation. It develops from the prescience of the designer and is dependent on acceptance by observers and wearers alike. 

When Clothes Become Fashion explores the structures and strategies which underlie fashion innovation, how fashion is perceived and the point at which clothing is accepted or rejected as fashion. The book provides a clear theoretical framework for understanding the world of fashion - its aesthetic premises, plurality of styles, performative impulses, social qualities and economic conditions. Book:

A Short History of Celebrity
Fred Inglis
Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 2009, ISBN: 9780691135625; 322pp.; Price: £20.95 Reviewer:
Dr Simon Morgan
Leeds Metropolitan University
Citation:
Dr Simon Morgan, review of A Short History of Celebrity, (review no. 994) URL: http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/994
Date accessed: 23 November, 2012

Celebrity is becoming a hot topic for academics of all kinds, witnessed by the launch of the journalCelebrity Studies earlier this year. However, in a 2007 article for History Today, Lucy Riall observed that ‘the history of celebrity has yet to be written’.Fred Inglis has made the first attempt to bridge that gap, in a book which is thought-provoking but ultimately frustrating. celebrity is a vital ‘social adhesive’in a society fragmenting under the pressures of globalisation, digitisation and loss of community The celebrity acts, necessarily in public; the public reacts by taking the action and, after transforming it for its own purposes, projects it, as a filthy or a glowing image, back upon its source. The wretched celebrity not only asked for it but must incorporate the image as amiably as possible, turning it for better or worse into corporeal reality This is a rather simplified version of what has been described more fluidly (and succinctly) elsewhere as the process by which audiences ‘productively consume’ celebrity images.Unfortunately, Inglis never really explores this process, or explains what he means by the audience transforming the celebrity action ‘for its own purposes’, let alone how these purposes may have changed over time. The result is a one-sided approach: if the audience is necessary to the production of celebrity, then half of the equation is missing. It is here that the scant attention paid to the ‘machinery’ is most keenly felt, because connection between audience and celebrity is facilitated by that machinery and its productions. FASHION

In a fashion system,clothes function as symbols that indicste social markers such as Status,gender,social group allegiance,personality ,fashionability and sexuality. The symbols are internalized or naturalized among a fashion culture so...
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