Farm Animals: Do They Deserve a Good Life?

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March 6, 2013
Farm Animals: Do They Deserve a Good Life?
When was the last time that you ate meat? Was it this morning when you had some bacon with your eggs? Or was it last night when you had that nice juicy steak? Whether it was today or yesterday, many people can agree that eating meat is just a way of life. Almost every meal comes with a good helping of some yummy poultry or beef. However, as many of us know, the ways that chickens and cattle are treated before being slaughtered are very unethical and unnecessary. I am happy to report though that there have been many changes dealing with these factory farm animals and the treatment they receive. It is unfortunate that it took the Mad Cow Disease scare in December 2003 before any changes were made, but at least advances in animal treatment are being made (Miller 88). Some of the changes that have taken place include new laws banning gestation, fast-food giants being more particular about where they get their food, and the certification on organic beef. I will be discussing these changes throughout this essay but there have been other changes such as the way cattle are killed. Now, instead of using a sledge hammer, the workers use a captive bolt pistol which is classified as a “more humane” way to kill the cattle. Before being cut up and served, hogs live a very miserable life. “Pregnant sows live in narrow gestation crates - about 2 by 7 feet, too small to turn around in - with slanted floors that allow waste to drop through” (Miller 90). Obviously, smaller crates would mean that more animals can be raised, therefore more money can be made by the supplier. But the size of these crates is unethical. Sows are impregnated many times until they turn 4 or 5 years old, and then they are sent to the slaughterhouse. The sow’s piglets spend little time with their mother until they are taken away (Wildman). Each time the sow gives birth she is moved to a farrowing stall, which is slightly bigger than the gestation...
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