Farewell to Manznar

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Farewell To Manzanar
Throughout the history of the U.S., there has been constant discrimination, prejudice, racism, and plain hatred toward things that were different from “the norm”. And in this case, I am referring to anything that isn’t what we consider American or white. When Japan attacked Peal Harbor in 1941, we reacted the same way we always have, we isolated ALL people of Japanese descent, and not just the people we believed were at fault. Just like people of African American descent before laws against slavery were established in 1864, we made them the enemy and treated them like they were lower than us. Farewell To Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki is the perfect example of how we, as Americans, responded to the Pearl Harbor attack. We acted on pure discrimination and let our fear take hold of our rational thoughts. Ultimately, we let the prejudice deep in the roots of our history get the best of us. “Public attitudes toward the Japanese in California were shifting rapidly…. Tolerance had turned to distrust and irrational fear. The hundred-year-old tradition of anti-Orientals on the wheat coast soon resurfaced, more vicious than ever. Its result became clear about a month later, when we were told to make our third and final move.”(Pg.16-17) this is a very clear example of how prejudice the US was to all of the Japanese people during this time. They treated them as if they were all on trial and had already been proven guilty, when they themselves had done nothing wrong. They suffered for being different and they suffered for their home land that they turned their backs on already, just to be treated as an outcast in their new homes, here in the U.S. “We went because the government told us to. And, in the case of my older brothers and sisters, we went with a certain amount of relief. They had all heard stories of Japanese homes being attacked, of beatings in the streets of California towns. They were as frightened of the Caucasians as Caucasians were of us.”...
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