Family Problem

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Problem in teenagers
Finding help for families, teenagers and children can be a challenge. But there is good news. Information and referral systems are available from our schools, medical offices, news magazines, the yellow pages and even the Internet. Many parents are finding help and discovering resources by asking family, friends and their co-workers. In fact, information and referrals based on a personal recommendation is a great way to find help. Unfortunately, finding help for children and families has become more difficult than finding help for most adults problems. For instance, health insurance has many restrictions that limit who you can see and what services they can provide. Most of the problems that families and children face are not covered and only certain diagnoses will be treated. Public programs across the country lack adequate funding. The schools have programs, but they desperately need more staff and money to meet the demands that currently exist. There are many private counselors who work with children, but there are only a few who work with families and children who have serious behavioral and emotional problems. The consequence when children don’t get the help they need can be tragic. Parents and families give up when they don’t know what to do, when they are discouraged and when they lack adequate information. Finding and getting help means you need to get oriented and understand the problems and potential solutions. Behavior Problems. In order to deal with a problem it will help a great deal if parents can describe the problem in terms that may lead to a solution. Here are the problems that I see parents and their children facing. Many of these will surface in small children or they may not appear until children become teenagers. •- Social withdrawal and isolation

- Refusal to go to school
- Demanding and selfish attitude
- Disregard for rules, responsibilities and family functioning •- Poor study behavior and skills
- Unfocused or disruptive behavior in classroom
- Grades and school performance dropping
- Erratic or emotionally unstable behavior
- Poor hygiene and grooming
- Behavior is disrespectful or defiant
- Involved in high risk and reckless activities
- Using alcohol or other drugs
- Skipping school
- Stealing or theft
- Destructive, threatening or violent behavior
- Self-harming or suicidal behavior
Typical Causes. It takes time for problems to become critical, life threatening or intolerable. At some point, one can trace the cause to one or more factors. A pattern of problems will usually occur over time before a problem becomes a crisis. Identifying these factors can help characterize the evolution of a problem or a crisis, the appropriate response and the potential solution that may be necessary. •- "Brittle" or fragile emotional temperament

- Social demands exceed current ability
- Peer and social pressures
- Failure to provide rules, discipline and a bonded relationship with a child •- Parental divorce or separation
- Family conflict and discord
- Neglect or abandonment
- Traumatic experience
- Undiagnosed medical or psychological problem
- Untreated parental alcoholism, drug abuse or mental disorder •- Alcohol and other drug use
What are the Solutions?. The first step is to define the problem and a potential cause. After that, you need to explore potential solutions. There are at least several dozen potential solutions to any problem. That is a lot to consider. Unfortunately, access to many of these resources may depend on the parent’s employment benefits and their income. Many public programs have waiting lists and may exclude children if the problem is not severe enough. Exclusion from public programs does not mean the problem is minor. Many programs are full and can only take children with more severe problems. The following is a partial list of potential solutions. •- Self-help...
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