Family Life Education

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Part I:
What is family life education? Include in your answer a discussion of the following concepts: a. A definition of family.
b. The purpose of family life education.
c. Its intended benefits, its intended audience(s).
d. The appropriate content or units within a family life education curriculum (including the contexts for family life education). e. Appropriate levels of educator/participant involvement. f. And ethical considerations.

A Definition of Family:
There are several different definitions of what family life education (FLE) is, dating back to 1962. Many may say the definitions that have been given are too broad and too vague, therefore, family life educators have moved beyond trying to develop a concise definition and have decided to discuss the aims and concepts that comprise family life education (Family Life Education, p.4). After extensive research, Thomas and Arcus concluded that family life education deals with families and individuals across the life span, it is based on the needs of families and individuals on an individual basis, it is a multidisciplinary study in a multi—professional practice, and is offered in many different settings. It is also takes an educational approach rather than a therapeutic approach and presents and respects the differences in family values. Lastly, it requires family life educators to be qualified and cognizant of the goals of family life education (Family Life Education, p. 6) The purpose of family life education:

In order for a family life educator to successfully develop the appropriate goals and objectives for his/her group, he/she must understand the purpose of family life education. He/she must know what it is they expect to accomplish and why (Family Life Education, p. 43). The purpose of FLE is to strengthen and enrich an individual’s and a family’s wellbeing (Thomas and Arcus 1992). Family life education programs are intended to be preventative measure, which equips individuals with the necessary resources needed to fulfill their family roles rather than repairing dysfunction within families. Some of the major objectives of family life education include, but are not limited to: 1. gaining insight into one's self and others;

2. acquiring knowledge about human development and behavior in the family setting over the life course; 3. understanding marital and family patterns and processes; 4. acquiring interpersonal skills for present and future family roles; and 5. Building strengths in individuals and families (Arcus and Thomas 1993). One may assume that if these as well as other objectives are met through family life education, then individuals and families will be better equipped able to handle or prevent problems when they arise. They will also be empowered to live their family lives in ways that are both personally satisfying and socially responsible ( Intended benefits and audience(s):

The intended benefits of family life education are to ensure individuals are educated in their roles and expectations within their family and teach them how to approach and resolve situations that may arise without negative results. The intended audiences for these programs include individuals from all aspect, which include, but are not limited to, age, race, gender, culture, ethnicity, marital status, and economic class.

The appropriate content or units within a family life education curriculum: In order for a family life educator to successfully develop and implement programs, he/she must develop and understand his/her philosophy about life. This knowledge and understanding will better equip them to assist others in developing skills needed to live more productive and satisfying lives. When developing curriculum for groups/programs the family life educator must consider how the members function as individuals and as a group. They must consider how ones thoughts/actions will affect others...
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