False Claims

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Rgtgfggdgdfsgggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggggg ggggggggggggggggggggggg ggggggggggggggggggggggg ggggggggggggggg gggggggggggggggg gggggg dfdfdf fdfdfdf dfdfdfdf dfdfdfdf ffdfdfd dfdfdfdf dfdf fdfdfdf d dff dddwsassee eeerrr errerer rerwren e rr er e re re rer e rer e r ere r er ert rtytytuy tyu ty ty u yuyuty ty rt yrtyrtyrt t yty try ty rty try rty rt yrt rtughuuhhihuihuh ewwewewe wewewe ttttt rrrrrr 45 45 45 njknjk hnjh lkl kl kl k mnkmnk nkn klj kj kj kj k jkj kjkj dffdf dfdfd t rt rtrtrdfdfdfdftrrt rtrt rtrt ererererre yty tytyt ererer er iujiuiu jk jk jk jk j It’s normal and therefore acceptable to have mistakes and undeveloped sections in your first draft. However, if you don’t understand the criteria or the mistakes I’ve pointed out, please see me. If you have many areas marked “no evidence,” don’t try to revise your first draft; it’ll be easier to start over.

The problem section eventually needs to include all of the following, some of which may be in the same paragraph though others will take several paragraphs: A. an anecdote (a story that illustrates the problem—this should be your first paragraph); this’ll be in a your own words today, but in later drafts you’ll quote the original; B. a definition and description of the problem--an explanation of what it is; define key terms; C. relevant background (maybe scientific or historic);

D. the size/scope of the problem (usually, the number of cases in a given time frame for a given area as well as some statistics on how wide spread the problem is); E. consequences of the problem (what happens as a result of the problem, which could include multiple.
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