Fahrenheit 451 Comparison Essay

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Fahrenheit 451
Ray Bradbury’s Prediction of the Future
TREVOR YOUNG

Fahrenheit 451 is a dystopian novel written by Ray Bradbury that depicts a futuristic American society where books are banned and independent thought is persecuted. Bradbury uses his imagination to take a hard look at a world consumed by technology, and he presents predictions about pleasure, violence and anti-intellectualism that are alarmingly similar to the modern American society. Notably, in both societies people find pleasure in entertainment that is endlessly preoccupying. Second, people are violent and careless. Finally, anti-intellectualism and suppression of independent thought affect both societies, as firemen ban books in Fahrenheit 451 and, in the modern society, authorities ban books that do not align with their moral and religious beliefs. There are many relations between the society portrayed in Fahrenheit 451 and the modern American society, first of which is the way people achieve happiness.

Firstly, Bradbury accurately depicts the future with media bombarding people’s lives. In Fahrenheit 451, instead of small black and white televisions, characters live in rooms called “TV parlours.” In these TV parlours, the entire walls are plated with massive flat screen televisions, sending out fast images with bright colours and loud noises. These TV parlours consume the characters’ lives and distract them from reality. In one scene, Montag is trying to gain his wife’s attention, yet she avoids him by saying she is preoccupied with her digital family on the TV program. For example, “"Will you turn the parlour off?" he asked. “That’s my family."” (Bradbury, Page 48) This shows that media in the novel obscures people’s perspective of reality. Later in the novel, Montag claims that if his wife would die, he would not cry of her death, but cry because he would not cry of her death. Other characters also say this, proving that families in Fahrenheit 451 are not...
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