Factors Involved in Motivating Employees

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Executive Summary

This study was conducted to determine the factors which motivate workers. It was limited to the perceptions of the full-time employees randomly selected by surveyconsole.com. A two-page questionnaire was administered to collect primary data. The collected data was analyzed and interpreted using simple statistical techniques.

The findings of the data indicated that the highest rated factors of employee motivation were salary, medical benefits, and overall job satisfaction. In addition, the day-to-day success of the company was one of the lower rated factors. According to the results of the study, workers, along with the recognition of the position, are looking for physical benefits they can grasp.

One of the main conclusions drawn from this study is that the glory and honor of the workplace are not the highest motivating factors. Therefore, companies must balance the intrinsic and extrinsic needs of its personnel in order to draw from them the highest quality of work possible. This will benefit both the employers and the employees.

Factors Involved in Motivating Employees
And What Benefits Employers Offer
That Really Matter

Section I

Introduction to the Study

Introduction

High level officials, managers and their advisers of companies throughout the world are curious about what factors of the job that motivate their employees the most. Managers need to be able to identify what motivates employees. Knowing these factors would allow management to utilize its employees in the most effective way possible. According to the administered survey, most workers are strongly motivated by salary and overall benefits.

Statement of the Problem

The purpose of this study was to determine what factors played the greatest role in employee motivation.

Significance of the Study

This study will primarily benefit the upper management positions of small and large companies nationwide. Using the analysis provided through the survey, business organizations can observe what employees are looking for when applying for a position. Furthermore, businesses may not want to squander large amounts of resources on criteria which most employees are not concerned with. By focusing on issues that grab the workers’ attention, companies not only satisfy their existing employees, but they would also attract new workers interested in the job. Management is concerned to whether its workers are performing at their highest potential. Knowing what motivates them can be a critical asset in the success of a company.

Scope of the Study

This study was limited to the perceptions of full-time business employees as to what factors of their job motivate them the most. For the purpose of this study, what defines full-time employment is set by the employer. This study was restricted to the random sampling of 83 individuals provided by surveyconsole.com. For the purpose of this study, employee motivation is defined as what drives individuals to apply for certain positions and what factors of their job spurs employees to perform at their peak level of output. Data for this study was collected during the spring of 2005.

Review of Related Literature

Motivation theories and their corresponding reward system implications from the article (Bowey). The “Economic Man” theory is where payments are directly linked to measured increments of work, as in payment by result. The “Economic Man with periodic fatigue” theory is like the Economic man theory but with regular rest and meal breaks for the employee.

The “Needs Theories” includes Human Relations; Maslow; Herzberg; McClelland; and McGregor. The reward systems implications is hourly or weekly salary with no incentive element. Emphasis on motivating through human relation skills, job enrichment or opportunities to satisfy higher order needs such as achievement.

Next is the “Expectancy Theory” where payments directly linked to...
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