Fact Sheet About White Bird-of-Paradise

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 148
  • Published : December 5, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Fact Sheet ST-604 October 1994

Strelitzia nicolai White Bird-of-Paradise1
Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2

INTRODUCTION
White Bird-of-Paradise is most often planted for its large, banana-like leaves and upright, clumping stalks which give an exotic feel to the landscape (Fig. 1). Plants can reach 20 to 30 feet in height with a spread of 10 feet though they are often seen much smaller. The five to eight-foot-long, cold-tender leaves are arranged in a fanlike display from the erect trunks and appear much like Traveler’s-Tree. The lower trunk becomes clear of leaves and exposed as the older leaves drop off. Leaves rip along the veins as they are blown by strong winds.

GENERAL INFORMATION
Scientific name: Strelitzia nicolai Pronunciation: streh-LIT-see-uh NICK-oh-lye Common name(s): White Bird-of-Paradise, Giant Bird-of-Paradise Family: Strelitziaceae USDA hardiness zones: 9B through 11 (Fig. 2) Origin: not native to North America Uses: container or above-ground planter; suitable for growing indoors; near a deck or patio; specimen; no proven urban tolerance Availability: generally available in many areas within its hardiness range Figure 1. Middle-aged White Bird-of-Paradise.

Crown density: open Growth rate: medium Texture: coarse

Foliage
Leaf arrangement: alternate (Fig. 3) Leaf type: simple Leaf margin: entire Leaf shape: oblong Leaf venation: pinnate Leaf type and persistence: broadleaf evergreen; evergreen Leaf blade length: >36 inches Leaf color: green

DESCRIPTION
Height: 20 to 30 feet Spread: 6 to 10 feet Crown uniformity: irregular outline or silhouette Crown shape: palm; upright

1. 2.

This document is adapted from Fact Sheet ST-604, a series of the Environmental Horticulture Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Publication date: October 1994. Edward F. Gilman, associate professor, Environmental Horticulture Department; Dennis G. Watson,...
tracking img