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Extrasensory Perception.

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Extrasensory Perception.

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  • April 27, 2003
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Extrasensory Perception

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and the mind. When most people think of a psychologist they think they are going to some shrink that will give them some advice, examine their personality or help them with their mental illnesses. The term psychology comes from two Greek words. Them being psyche, which means "soul," and logos, which means "the study of." Before psychology became established in science, it was popularly connected with extrasensory perception (ESP) and other paranormal phenomena.

Extrasensory perception is the knowledge of external objects or events without the aid of the senses. It is most commonly called the sixth sense, and it is sensory information that a person receives and provides them with information of the past, present, and future. Since Ancient times, people have wondered about psychic experiments and how they seem to defy scientific explanation.

Extrasensory perception is commonly divided into three kinds of phenomena. The first kind is telepathy. Telepathy is the perception of another person's thoughts by means beyond the ordinary senses. Frederic W. H. Myers conducted the first logical study of telepathy in 1882, when the Society for Physical Research was founded in London. The first studies of telepathy; however, were only rarely experimental. These studies consisted of just spur of the moment incidents that were sighted. The individuals that were studied were self-claimed psychics. These psychics were rarely examined under anything similar to laboratory conditions. Myers defined telepathy as "the communication of impressions of any kind from one mind to another, independent of the recognized channels of sense." An example of telepathy would be that a person in one room could know what a person is thinking in another room. Most scientists don't believe that telepathy exists because of the thorough tests they conducted failed to produce any reliable evidence.

The second kind of...