Expository Writing

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Education has always been a major concern in the Philippines and it seems that the crisis in this area has become worse over time. In recent years, problems such as shortage in classrooms, educational tools and supplies have become very evident in public schools. Low funding, poverty and the current economic crisis are cited as the reasons behind the educational problems faced by the country. Add to that the yearly tuition hikes in private schools, colleges and universities, which makes it harder for Filipino families to afford quality education. These continuing problems in education are posing a major threat for the Filipinos to become competitive in the global market. A few months ago, news programs such as 24 Oras and Saksi revealed how the shortage of classrooms has affected the Filipino students. Many public schools in Quezon City, Paranaque and other cities in Manila try to squeeze in 60 students or more in a classroom. In Munoz-Palma High School, some classes are held on the corridors, stairwells, gymnasiums, and faculty lounges because all the classrooms are fully occupied (Mydans, 2009, par. 9-13). Other schools, such as Balibago National High School in Laguna, implemented double sessions to prevent overcrowding. According to a statement by Juan Miguel Luz, a former undersecretary of education, the government has already implemented the project of building classrooms in 2006, but as of 2009 there is still a shortage of 27,124 classrooms all over the Philippines (Mydans, par. 8). One major factor that was cited as the cause of overcrowding in public schools is the expensive tuition in private schools. As the tuition in private schools continue to increase, particularly in secondary level, more and more students are forced to transfer to public schools. In 2005, statistics showed that the enrollment rate in private schools have dropped to 21% from the 62% rate back in 1965. Public schools, on the other hand, which has 38% enrollment rate before, now have...
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