Expository Essay on War Using Example from Tomorrow When the War Began and Poetry

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  • Topic: Influenza, Swine influenza, 2009 flu pandemic
  • Pages : 7 (2061 words )
  • Download(s) : 466
  • Published : September 5, 2011
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H1N1
Medical Report on Swine Flu

Table of Contents:

Introduction......................................................................Pg.3
Health Risks:
Case Study One.................................................................Pg.4
Case Study Two.................................................................Pg.5
Variations of Health in People Who Wave the Same Virus...............................................................................Pg. 6
Preventative Measures.......................................................Pg. 7
Public Impact...................................................................Pg. 8
Recommendations.............................................................Pg.9
Conclusion.....................................................................Pg.10
Bibliography....................................................................Pg.11
Appendix.........................................................................Pg.12

Introduction
Honourable Paul Lucas, during 2009 and 2010 there was an outbreak of Influenza A H1N1, or colloquially known as ‘Swine Flu’. Influenza viruses belong to the family Orthomyxovirdae and are classified into three distinct types, influenza A, B and C. Only influenza viruses that are under the category A and B are communicable among humans and are responsible for most cases of the seasonal flu. Hemagglutin (H) and neuraminidase (N) are proteins found in Influenza A and are used to further define subtypes of influenza (such as H1N1 or H5N1 [bird flu]). H1N1 contains mutated genes from the seasonal flu, an avian (bird) virus and a swine (pig) virus, hence the name ‘Swine Flu’. This mutation occurred because pigs can be infected with human influenza, avian virus and swine virus. If this happens simultaneously, genetic reassortment can occur, which is what led to the development of H1N1. Influenza A H1N1 is spread much the same way as the seasonal flu, through air-born droplets caused by sneezing and coughing, touching infected objects and subsequently touch other areas of the body and transfer of bodily fluids. This report will outline two case studies and the medical risks H1N1 incurs on them and ways of treatment, it will also suggest possible ways to mitigate and prevent further outbreaks of the influenza A H1N1.

Case study one
The first case study presents a twenty-five year-old female, who is in her third trimester of pregnancy that has contracted H1N1. Her symptoms (in order of severity) include vomiting, diarrhoea, fever, and aches and pains in her joints and muscles. These symptoms alone present the following medical risks. Firstly, dehydration which is due to the onset of diarrhoea and vomiting. This is because during periods of diarrhoea, peristaltic movement of the small and large intestine speeds up to release harmful bacteria and viruses that may be present in the gastrointestinal tract. This means that digested food spends less time in the large intestine, which can subsequently lead to dehydration, as the large intestine is where water is predominantly absorbed. Vomiting can also lead to a lack of nutrients and energy entering the body. These...
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