Explore the Ways Strong Feelings About Love Are Presented in 'in Paris with You' and 'Quickdraw'

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Poems are commonly used to convey strong feelings about the true nature of love. However, these feelings can take many different shapes which articulate positive as well as negative perceptions of love. The four poems that embody these different features are ‘Hour’ by Carol Ann Duffy, ‘Sonnet 116’ by William Shakespeare, ‘In Paris with you’ by James Fenton and ‘Quickdraw’ by Carol Ann Duffy. Two poems that share similar feelings about love are 'in Paris with you' and 'Quickdraw' as they both explore the theme of conflict and emotional pain instigated by love. Fenton makes it clear in the first stanza that the speaker has been hurt in the past, claiming that he was 'one of your talking wounded' which is a pun on the phrase 'walking wounded'. However, this phrase is pursued by a. Use of neologism 'maroonded' which serves to create an apparent carefree tone carried on through-out the poem. However, as the poem progresses it becomes apparent that the light-hearted mood hides a deeper subtext and is a cover for the speaker's true feelings. Similarly Duffy makes use of an extended metaphor 'a western stand-off', using the slightly chilidish image to to conceal her true feelings and the more serious emotional pain which results from love. She makes use of lexical choices from the semantic field of battle or a western style stand-off "guns, trigger, Sheriff, last chance saloon" to reflect how she is feeling in the relationship as well as avoiding the reality of the issue. Despite the light-hearted tones of the poems, the reader's attention is drawn to the subtle darker subtexts which reveal the speakers' true feelings in both poems. Fenton indirectly adresses the speakers true feelings about love by using an ambiguous phrase 'in paris with you' repetitively. However, towards the end of the poem it soon becomes clear that "paris" is a euphemism for love. Love is really what the speajer is trying to convey but in a cautious way clearly due to a phobia of rejection or...
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