Exemplary Leadership

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Nicole Lomupo

Examples of Exemplary Leadership

I have not plagiarized on any aspect of this assignment.
The Wall Street Journal is a national news source indispensible to corporate industries and business professionals. The publication discloses current information on economics, politics, industry leaders, and international relations. The articles and discussions printed in the Wall Street Journal present readers with an opportunity to gain sufficient expertise about management and leadership. Most importantly, one can depict how these roles are incorporated and utilized in competitive markets. This report is a representation of different leadership styles identified in Wall Street Journal (WSJ) articles discussing the healthcare industry and corporations alike. Undoubtedly, many would agree the purpose of developing or entering into a business is to become wealthy through the success of the company. Success entails many different contributing factors but, primarily begins with administrative personnel. The terms executive, supervisor, director, manager, and administrator display alternative titles to one synonymous role: LEADER. Leaders are placed in an influential position and expected to motivate employees to perform well. How a leader operates, directly affects the functioning of staff workload and thus, the outcome of the company. The Wall Street Journal features many articles exemplary to a variety of leadership styles. Dating from January 15, 2011 to April 9th, 2011, one could find examples of Transformational or Autocratic Leadership within articles discussing the new healthcare law. Because the healthcare law is recent and extremely controversial, many articles have been published approaching the topic and likewise appear exemplary of a Democratic Leadership style. Other aspects of healthcare such as, specialty services and Information Technology (IT) have, too, been mentioned in exemplary leadership articles demonstrating Servant and/or Transformational styles. Health insurance companies are constantly changing and never an absent subject. Negative examples of leadership seemingly fall under these commentaries. Slightly changing direction away from health care and toward the automobile industry, Toyota flourishes as a popular topic in the Wall Street Journal. Intriguingly, numerous articles about the company and how the organization operates have been displayed in several issues. The sequence of printed articles discussing Toyota captures a transformation from one leadership style to another. The CEO publicly unveils how, and why, he turns his company from operating under a Bureaucratic style to a more “bottom-up” leadership approach. Examples of Exemplary Leadership

January 20, 2009 marked one of the most historical events this country will ever encounter. On this day Barack Obama was sworn into presidency as the first African American president of the United States of America. Along with his new position in office, also came proposals for new laws and big changes in budgets. Specifically, an entire healthcare reform is under way and this country, obviously, cannot turn away from controversy and debate about the subject. As the most prominent leader of our country, President Obama is only appropriate to exemplify in reference to leadership styles. The WSJ is overwhelmingly covered in articles concerning the policy changes President Obama is proposing and the new healthcare law is no exception. Tuesday, March 1, 2011, The WSJ published an article written by Janet Adamy. Her article represents a great example of Democratic (participative) Leadership and is titled, Obama Offers Skeptical Governors Bigger Role Under the Health Law. Janet Adamy’s feature discusses Obama’s offer to allow state governors more flexibility in deciding how to expand health insurance coverage. His proposal presents an invitation for the governors to give their input concerning the law change and partake in a larger...
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